Feel Better with Five-Minute Yoga

Be more energized with just a few minutes a day of yoga.

Since beginning this blog, we have presented a number of posts on the value of exercise. As well as the implications of feeling tired. To complement these discussions, we now look at yoga. In particular, how to feel better with five-minute yoga.

How to Feel Better with Five-Minute Yoga

What Is Yoga?

For those not fully aware of yoga, we turn to Asia Trend for insights:

Yoga exercises improve circulation, stimulate the abdominal organs, and put pressure on the glandular system of the body, which can generally result to better health. The five principles of yoga are the basis of attaining a healthy body and mind through the practice of yoga.

        1. Proper Relaxation
        2. Appropriate Exercise
        3. Proper Breathing
        4. Suitable Diet
        5. Positive Thinking and Meditation

Also, consider this infographic.

Feel Better with Yoga

Five-Minute Yoga

Could you really do an effective yoga routine in five minutes? According to Stephanie Mansour,  writing for CNN health, the answer is yes:

The countless hours that many of us have sat at a makeshift desk in quarantine can be detrimental — physically and mentally. Hunched over a computer day in and day out, you’re not just wreaking havoc on your posture, but you’re likely feeling out of sorts and drained, too.

If you wake up feeling stressed or overwhelmed with the thought of beginning another day in isolation, a daily yoga practice can be helpful. Practicing brief sessions of yoga and mindfulness can significantly improve energy levels and brain function.

 

Along with the physical practice of yoga, the breathwork,  has a significant positive impact on energy levels and cognitive function. Research has shown that slow, steady breathing linked with movement helps reduce stress and improve autonomic and higher neural center functioning.

 
To learn Mansour’s 5-minute yoga routine (with photos showing her suggested poses), click the image.

Feel Better with Five-Minute Yoga
Stephanie Mansour kicks off her morning with an energizing yoga routine in bed. Here she demonstrates the seated twist.

 

We Need More Humor Now

Trying to brighten your day. 🙂

As we reported in April, laughter is healthy. Two months later, we need more humor now.
 

Chuckles Here: We Need More Humor Now

These cartoons  are intended to be humorous. And again, we realize that humor is in the eye of  the beholder. So, here goes.

We Need More Humor Now
From Love This Pic
From Fuel Running
From LVHN News
From LVHN News
From Times of India
From Kids World Fun

 

Low-Risk and High-Risk Activities Activities

On this Memorial Day, and every day thereafter, please be careful. See what activities are risky or not.

In prior posts, we looked at Coronavirus Thoughts from a High-Risk Perspective and Lighthearted Look at Possible Activities.

Now, we turn to a valuable list of low-risk and high-risk activities from NPR:

“It has been around two months of quarantine for many of us. The urge to get out and enjoy the summer is real. But what’s safe? We asked a panel of infectious disease and public health experts to rate the risk of summer activities, from backyard gatherings to a day at the pool to sharing a vacation house with another household.”

“One big warning: Your personal risk depends on your age and health, the prevalence of the virus in your area, and the precautions you take during any of these activities. Also, many areas continue to restrict the activities described here, so check your local laws.”

“And there’s no such thing as a zero-risk outing right now. As states begin allowing businesses and public areas to reopen, decisions about what’s safe will be up to individuals. It can help to think through the risks the way the experts do.”

“‘We can think of transmission risk with a simple phrase: time, space, people, place,” explains Dr. William Miller, an epidemiologist at Ohio State University. Here’s his rule of thumb: The more time you spend and the closer in space you are to any infected people, the higher your risk. Interacting with more people raises your risk, and indoor places are riskier than outdoors.’

To see what is low risk and what is high risk, click on an activity:

Low-Risk and High-Risk Activities
Image by Meredith Miotke for NPR