Spotting Skin Cancer to Stop It

During the summer, we blogged about what to do to avoid getting cancer. Today, we focus on self-examination as a way to avoid skin cancer.

As the Skin Cancer Foundation notes: 

“Coupled with yearly skin exams by a doctor, self-examination is the best way to ensure that you don’t become another skin cancer statistic. If you can spot it, you can stop it.”

Here are some tips.

Spotting Skin Cancer to Stop It
 

Pancreatic Cancer Infographic

November marks Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month.

As a pancreatic cancer survivor, November is a special month for me.

Pancreatic Cancer Action puts it this way:

“November marks Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month, a time when people across the world come together to fight back against, and raise the profile of, pancreatic cancer! It is a time of the year when we have the most voices speaking out the disease, raising funds for early diagnosis research and raising awareness in their local communities.”

Learn more about PC by reviewing this infographic from the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network.

Pancreatic Cancer Infographic
 

International Health Efficiency Scores

Click the image to learn more about the health-efficiency index and to see the latest index rankings. The United States is tied for 54th!

The United States annually spends more than $9,500 per person for health care. Nonetheless, the effectiveness of this spending lags far behind many other nations (that spend a lot less).

According to a recent Bloomberg report:

“Want medical care without quickly draining your fortune? Try Singapore or Hong Kong as your healthy havens. The U.S. will cost you the most for treatment, both in absolute terms and relative to average incomes. Yet, the life expectancy of Americans — about 79 years — was exceeded by more than 25 countries and territories, according to an annual Bloomberg analysis in almost 200 economies.” 

“A health-efficiency index was then created to rank those with average lifespans of at least 70 years, GDP per-capita exceeding $5,000 and a minimum population of 5 million. And Americans aren’t getting their medical money’s worth, according to each of the categories.” 

“The U.S. had the second-highest per-capita spending on health care at $9,536. Switzerland’s average based on gross domestic product was $9,818. But that $282 supplement helped deliver an extra 4.2 years of life — with the average Swiss lifespan of almost 83.”

Click the image to learn more about the health-efficiency index and to see the latest index rankings. The United States is tied for 54th!

International Health Efficiency Scores

Increase Your Energy When You’re Too Tired to Workout

Many of us often feel tired. This may make us less motivated to exercise or even move. So, what can we do to increase our energy level?

Many of us often feel tired. This may make us less motivated to exercise or even move. So, what can we do to increase our energy level?

The American Heart Association has an excellent infographic: “Power Up to Move More.

 

Health and Alcohol Do Not Mix Well

We’ve all heard the adage “everything in moderation.” If we want to be healthy, that certainly includes alcohol consumption. Not surprisingly, alcohol consumption by males far exceeds that by females. BE CAREFUL OUT THERE!

According to Niall McCarthy for Statista:

“A major global study published in The Lancet has found the there is no safe level of alcohol consumption. The research compared levels of alcohol use and its impact on health across 195 countries from 1990 to 2016. In many countries, moderate drinking has been associated with health benefits for years and in places like France, a daily glass of red wine has been viewed as good for the heart. “

“Yet, the new research claims that the harmful impact of alcohol far outweighs any benefits with even an occasional drink proving harmful. In 2016, 2.8 million deaths were attributed to alcohol. And it was the leading risk factor for premature mortality and disability among people in the 15-49 age bracket.” 

“The infographic below focuses on the top-10 countries for alcohol attributable deaths. Specifically, it highlights the massive gender gap in mortality. In The United States, alcohol caused 71,00 male deaths and 19,000 female deaths in 2016.”

Health and Alcohol Do Not Mix Well