Audio Podcasts to Keep Us Going

More ways to occupy our time

Many of us who are mostly at home have reached a high level of boredom. No matter how interesting our activities, we’ve probably been doing the same things for quite a well.

To help us stay on an even keel, the AAA has devised an audio playlist for us to listen to during our stay at home.

Here are some selections from the AAA.

All Told— A human-interest podcast by The Washington Post. It reports first-hand stories of Americans whose lives are affected by the coronavirus pandemic. They’ve recently interviewed a physician assistant, a minister for the homeless and even a blues musician.

Coronavirus Daily — NPR’s new podcast reporting on coronavirus, hosted by Kelly McEvers of the NPR show, Embedded. Coronavirus Daily posts updates every weekday, and they’re usually about ten minutes long.

Coronavirus: Fact vs. Fiction — A podcast by CNN, hosted by their chief medical correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta. This show also updates every weekday.

Coronavirus Global Update — A podcast by BBC World Service, which reports on coronavirus from affected areas around the world. Unlike the previous two podcasts, Coronavirus Global Update has a far more, well, global perspective.

Staying In with Emily and Kumail— Married couple Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani are staying in – like a lot of us are. Their podcast is all about getting through life “in the weirds,” their term for the current situation. All proceeds from Staying In go to charities who are helping to alleviate the effects of the coronavirus.

 

Lighthearted Look at Possible Activities

There is a light ahead.

We still need a chuckle or two during this period. Check out this image from the United Nations:

Mental health is an important part of overall wellbeing, especially now as anxiety and loneliness are on the rise due to the pandemic. This poster is digitally illustrated and designed to highlight the things one can do in the comfort of your own home to increase physical and mental wellbeing during the lockdown/isolation period. Its is a lighthearted take on a tough subject. Image created by Chevon Beckley. Submitted for United Nations Global Call Out To Creatives – help stop the spread of COVID-19.

Click the image to see a larger version.

Lighthearted Look at Possible Activities
 

More COVID-19 Resources

Valuable sites for you to visit.

During the last few weeks, we have made several posts related to COVID-19.  Given the ongoing nature of the virus, today we offer more COVID-19 resources. 

Click the links:

And, if you know someone you think feels overly stressed or anxious, please refer them to the following site. Just click on the image.

More COVID-19 Resources

 

Feeling Sorry for Ourselves

Is it OK to feel self-pity? Read on for an interesting discussion.

Many of us (including the author) have  — at least for a brief time — felt sorry for ourselves during our  l-o-n-g self-quarantining period.  So, three questions occur to us. (1) What is self-pity? (2) Is this an acceptable form of behavior? (3) How do we avoid feeling sorry for ourselves?

Note: In this article, we treat “feeling sorry for ourselves” and “self-pity” as interchangeable terms.

What Is Self-Pity?

From Phrase Mix:

Feeling sorry for yourself/myself means to think a lot about your own problems. A person who is “feeling sorry for” him- or herself is not only sad, but also thinking things like: “Why did this have to happen to me?” “It’s not fair!” “No one loves me.” “Everything is ruined now!”

From Vocabulary.com:

If you’re completely focused on feeling badly about your own problems and complaints, you’re feeling self-pity. Your self-pity can make it hard to appreciate that other people may face more serious troubles than you do.

When you feel sorry for yourself, or overly sad about the difficulties you face, you’re indulging in self-pity. It’s often easier to identify self-pity in other people than in yourself, partly because your own self-pity keeps your attention focused inward.

Is Self-Pity an Acceptable Form of Behavior?

Some experts believe that self-pity is almost never acceptable behavior. However, we believe that answering this question depends upon three issues. One, the severity of the negative situation. Two, our level of control to fix a bad situation. And three, how long we allow ourselves to engage in self-pity.

For excellent insights, we turn to Kat George, writing for Bustle:

I don’t think anyone should spend too much time feeling sorry for themselves.  But, sometimes I do feel sorry for myself. It’s a natural human emotion. And one you have to fight to get over when you feel it creeping in. It’s okay to sometimes indulge that feeling, insofar as you might want to spend an evening on the couch crying and eating chocolates. Or whatever else it is you do when you’ve decided the world has constricted into a tiny bubble that includes only your head. At the same time, nothing else exists except your extreme sorrow.

Most of the time, indulging in a little bit of self-important wallowing is the best way to move on. I often feel that once I’ve wasted a day feeling sorry for myself, the next day I am bright-eyed and bushy-tailed. As well as ready to pick myself up by the seat of my pants and enthusiastically have at it again. Cleansing yourself of self-pity is important, because if you hang onto it it will make you unbearable and unproductive. 

How Do We Avoid Feeling Sorry for Ourselves?

First, consider this tip from Amy Morin, writing for Forbes:

Self-pity causes you to think, “I deserve better.” On the other hand, gratitude is about thinking, “I have more than I deserve.” So the easiest way to conquer feelings of self-pity is to change the way you think.

Studies show that the feeling of gratitude offers a variety of benefits, including better sleep, improved health, better stress resilience, and more mental strength.

Every time you are tempted to complain about how bad your situation is, think about three things you’re grateful for. Some people even take it a step further and write them down in a gratitude journal.

Second, read Korin Miller’s observations for Women’s Health:

It can feel like you’re missing out on a bunch of awesome life experiences, and that can be a tough thing to swallow. But eventually life will get back to normal.* And it’s crucial to keep reminding yourself of that fact. Also, you’re not the only one dealing with this right now; the entire country, and most of the world is, too. While you’re in the thick of this experience, even when you’re upset that you’re missing out on certain things, it’s crucial to still allow for moments of happiness.

* Although, it is likely that we will face a “new normal” for at least a while. Therefore, we should try as hard we can to be grateful when we return to some semblance of normal — even if it is a new normal!!!! 🙂

Click the image to read a lot more helpful tips by Miller.

Feeling Sorry for Ourselves

 

Tools for a Calmer YOU

FREE tools to help you relax.

Today, we look at tools for a calmer YOU. And we focus on the Calm.com Web site. [Please note: Calm.com offers both free and premium access to its site. As a nonprofit blog, we emphasize free materials. And Calm’s free features offer a lot of tools.]

But first, review this comment from GCC Exchange:

“Keeping calm is a bliss that most of us don’t realize in life. When you keep calm in the most dreadful conditions of life, you open up the avenues for solutions. Thus, it is important to sort out even the major crises of your life. Everyone deals with the harsh challenges our lives give to us. And to survive into this busy world, we need to be patient. There are times when you need to stay mum instead of quibbling over a thing. Yes, sometimes we face circumstances where it is difficult to keep calm. Nonetheless, you still need to try!”

Free Calm.com Tools for a Calmer YOU

According to Calm.com:

“We’re the #1 app for Sleep, Meditation and Relaxation, with over 50 million downloads and over 700,000 5-star reviews. We’re honored to be an Apple BEST OF 2018 award winner, Apple’s App of the Year 2017, Google Play Editor’s Choice 2018, and to be named by the Center for Humane Technology as ‘the world’s happiest app’.”

Free Vs. Premium Access to Calm.com

The distinction appears in the help section of Calm.com. As highlighted here.

Free from Calm.com

As Calm.com notes at its blog:

“These challenging times remind us that it’s never enough to just look after ourselves. We must look after each other too. This is what it means to Calm Together. In that spirit, we’ve handpicked some of our favorite meditations, sleep stories, movement exercises, journals, and music. All of the resources on this page are free to use, and to share. May they bring you, and those around you, peace.”

Click the image to access these free programs.

Tools for a Calmer YOU

 

Happiness While Self-Quarantining

Several keys for being happier NOW.

Yes, we know that self-quarantining is tough on us. Both physically and psychologically. But, we need to fight our way through COVID-19. Today, we consider the keys to happiness in any situation.

First, take a look at these prior posts:

Keys to Happiness While Self-Quarantining

In doing research for this post, we visited a number of online sources. The following observations synthesize our research, as articulated by two of those sources.

From Wanderlust Worker

Emotional Well-Being: 7 Keys to Happiness:

  1. Practice mindfulness — Meditate and concentrate on the here and now. Discard negative thoughts. Learn to connect body and mind and see the positive side of your daily life situations. Do not live in the future, do not worry about things that have not yet happened, and live the moment.
  2. Exercise Exercising regularly makes you feel better about yourself. Not only does it increase your energy levels, but it also reduces stress.
  3. Surround yourself with positive people Spend time with family and friends [even if remotely], so you’ll never regret not having spent time with them. Your relationships with others are fundamental to your being happy. That is why you should cherish them.
  4. Listen to music —  This provides many psychological benefits, and, moreover, we can control our mood depending on the type of music we listen to.
  5. Get outdoors and enjoy the good weather — The sun is a powerful natural antidepressant. So, get off the sofa and switch off the TV. 
  6. Accept yourself as you are We all go through bad times and it’s not good for you to keep your feelings to yourself. Pretending that everything is going well will only frustrate you and make you even more miserable.
  7. Find time for yourself — You must always find a moment during each day to dedicate to yourself.

From Red Online

The 10 Keys to Happiness That Are Scientifically Proven:

Happiness While Self-Quarantining
 

Best Health News Stories of the 2010s

Health advances of the 2010s

As we confront the ramifications of the coronavirus, we also have to consider the overall state of healthcare. [We will have a post on the coronavirus in the near future. We’ve been waiting to get more clarity, rather than make comments based on conjecture.]

Sometimes, when we’re feeling let down by the health care system, we need to also read about good news. Thus, today’s post: Best Health News Stories of the 2010s.

According to 24/7 Wall St., here are 15 of the top health news stories of the past decade, MOSTLY good: 

“The 2010s will go down in history as a decade of many newsworthy health-related stories, many of which are not good news — Ebola, measles, antibiotic resistance. But the years since 2010 were not all bad. Many good things happened, too, and some of them will have a lasting effect for generations to come. 24/7 Tempo went through multiple news archives. We read dozens of articles published since 2010 and selected 15 of the most positive health news that made headlines.”

“Some of the most talked about stories over the last few years have influenced health guidelines, treatment of serious disease, and even government policy. Reports of significant research developments in the treatment and prevention of chronic and other conditions gave hope to millions of Americans. Some of the good news broke as recently just a few months ago .”

Here are the 15 – in chronological order from earliest to latest. Click the link above to read a lot more.

        • CT scans in high risk patients to reduce overall lung cancer mortality
        • Melanoma drug approved
        • Gene editing now possible
        • FDA reports trans fat should not be considered ‘safe’
        • HIV prevention pill
        • New way to treat cavities
        • 3D printing of human organs
        • Immunotherapy and cancer
        • Opioid crisis recognized as national public health emergency
        • Early-stage Alzheimer’s treatment
        • Smoking rates at all-time low
        • Cystic fibrosis treatment approved by FDA
        • Second HIV patient goes into remission
        • Blood test detects breast cancer 5 years early
        • Finding a cure for arthritis

Unfortunately, the one negative story out of the 15 involves the opioid epidemic.