Inspirational Quotes – Part 3

Previously, we cited inspirational quotes from Good Reads and Wisdom Quotes. Here are several more such quotes.

These quotes are from Brainy Quote:

“Happiness is not something you postpone for the future; it is something you design for the present.” Jim Rohn

“Be happy for this moment. This moment is your life.” Omar Khayyam

“Every day is a new day. You’ll never be able to find happiness if you don’t move on.” Carrie Underwood

“Happiness lies in the joy of achievement and the thrill of creative effort.” Franklin D. Roosevelt

“Happiness is a butterfly, which when pursued, is always just beyond grasp, but which, if you sit down quietly, may alight upon you.” Nathaniel Hawthorne

“Happiness is like a kiss. You must share it to enjoy it.” Bernard Meltzer

 

Click the image to read additional Brainy Quote sayings on being inspired.

Inspirational Quotes - Part 3

Live Like You Were Dying

For me, this is the title of a great song from Tim McGraw about making the most of every day. And one real-life hero, who has set a great inspirational example for us all, is Susan Briscoe, who wrote an article for the Huffington Post. It appeared on March 9, 2018. It is titled : “I Am Dying From Terminal Cancer. Here’s What It’s Taught Me About Living.”

Susan, you are really one of my heroes. We wish you the very best. You are in my thoughts and prayers.

As Briscoe says about her situation:

“Pre-diagnosis, I had just turned 50 and was extremely fit, healthy, and happy. Nobody could keep up with me! I was excited about life. It had occurred to me that, with my family’s excellent longevity genes — and some good luck — I might very well live another 50 years. I was enthused about the 30 years’ worth of creative activities and research projects that I had ambitiously sketched out for myself. Both my sons, also healthy, happy, and on-track, had moved out on their own; and after more than 20 years of solo parenting, I was ready for a little more fun. Deeply aware of and grateful for all the privileges that made my wonderfully full life possible, I figured I had had more joy in life than most would ever have.”

“But I didn’t get the good luck part, so now I am going to die. And that is okay. That was the first thing I told my loved ones. My boyfriend. My parents. My two boys. ‘I have a very bad cancer. I’m not going to be around much longer. It’s okay.’ They looked so hard into my eyes, gripping my hands, tears streaming down their faces, as I told them this. When I got to the ‘okay part, they nodded. They knew I meant it. I was okay. It was okay. They were going to be okay.”

“Many people I meet have imagined me in a state of pure devastation and distress at my diagnosis. Loss brings grief; and because grief is painful, like everyone else, I try to avoid it. But the flip side of grief is gratitude for having had whatever is lost to begin with. I have learned that, to a surprising degree, I have a choice about which side to focus on. I could be sad about all I won’t experience in life ― becoming a grandmother is one of the hardest for me ― or I can be grateful for all the gifts, like my wonderful boys, that I was given and fully appreciated. Choosing a state of gratitude has allowed me to remain happy and even joyous in this time. Yes, there is still grief, but the tears are fleeting, and lately rare.”

The Death Project is a blog where I journal about my life with terminal cancer. I wanted people to know that dying doesn’t have to be as bad as we fear.”

 Click the image to read more about Susan Briscoe’s personal journey.

Live Like You Were Dying

 

Feeling Fortunate – Not Sorry for Oneself

I am truly blessed and appreciate the life I live.  I have never once said “why me?” since I was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Rather, I have always asked “how was I so lucky to be diagnosed early enough to be able to have  surgery?” And I try as hard as I can not to be distracted by continuing side effects. Life is great. 🙂

Consider this excerpt from my FREE book on Surviving Cancer and Embracing Life: My Personal Journey:

I consider myself the luckiest man on the earth EVERY DAY. I have felt this way each day since February 12, 2015. That was the date of my Whipple surgery. Why am I the luckiest man alive?

* I have a great family that has been with me every step of the way.

* Because of my endocrinologist, Dr. Joseph Terrana, I was diagnosed very, very early and thus I was able to have surgery because the cancer had not spread to my lymph nodes.

* Through the prodigious skill of Dr. Gene Coppa and his team, my Whipple surgery was a great success.

* Due to my excellent oncology team headed by Dr. Jeffrey Vacirca and his right-hand person Diana Youngs, my chemotherapy was conducted with compassion and caring – even when the treatments were the toughest.

* My friends and fellow cancer survivors continue to be there for me.

* Despite the dire prognosis for those with pancreatic cancer, I was able to dance with my daughter and give a toast at her wedding.

* I have been able to continue working and doing what I love.

* I can exercise and keep myself in the best possible shape. (I actually went to the gym while undergoing chemo).

* And my wife Linda and I have traveled since my surgery, including a “restful” vacation in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico; a cruise from Amsterdam down to St. Petersburg, Russia; a visit to Curacao; and a family vacation in Eastern Mexico. With more to come!

Feeling Fortunate - Not Sorry for Oneself

Integrative Cancer Care

Today, we presenting an infographic from Cancer Treatment Centers of America. This chart presents a more holistic approach to patient care. Every step in the process must be coordinated among treatment modalities.

Click twice to view a larger version.

Integrative Cancer Care
 

Do YOU Wash Your Hands Well Enough?

For anyone wanting to be more hygienic, washing our hands properly is quite important. Do YOU Wash Your Hands Well Enough? Using Purell or some other hand sanitizer is not enough.
 

Do YOU Wash Your Hands Well Enough?

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture:

“A new study from the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows that when it comes to handwashing before meals, consumers are failing to properly clean their hands 97 percent of the time. Rushed handwashing can lead to cross-contamination of food and other surfaces, resulting in foodborne illness.” [WOW!!!]

These are several findings from the USDA:

  • Handwashing — “The study revealed that consumers are not washing their hands correctly 97 percent of the time. Most consumers failed to wash their hands for the necessary 20 seconds. And numerous participants did not dry their hands with a clean towel.”
  • Thermometer use — “Results reveal that only 34 percent of participants used a food thermometer to check that their burgers were cooked properly. Of those who did use the food thermometer, nearly half still did not cook the burgers to the safe minimum internal temperature.”
  • Cross contamination — “The study showed participants spreading bacteria from raw poultry onto other surfaces and food items in the test kitchen. 48 percent of the time are contaminating spice containers used while preparing burgers. 11 percent of the time are spreading bacteria to refrigerator handles. And 5 percent of the time are tainting salads due to cross-contamination.”
  • “The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 48 million Americans are sickened with foodborne illnesses each year, resulting in roughly 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths. Children, older adults and those with compromised immune systems are especially at risk.”

Click the USDA logo to read more.

Be safer!!!

 

How Body Weight Relates to Cancer

Question: Do you know how body weight relates to cancer? Check out the information from the American Cancer Society.

We all need to do the best we can to avoid problems that may adversely impact upon our health. Below is some good advice.

An Infographic: How Body Weight Affects Cancer

According to the American Cancer Society:

“There is growing data suggesting a strong relationship between excess body weight and increased risk of certain cancers. This infographic highlights current research that shows the significant cancer risk of excess body weight, poor nutrition and physical inactivity. It also highlights ways to reduce that risk by following American Cancer Society guidelines for achieving and maintaining a healthy weight.”


How Body Weight Affects Cancer