Reopening and the Disabled

Risks and rewards of COVID-19 behavior for the disabled.

 
A while back, during more normal times, we looked at travel and the disabled. Now, we look  at reopening and the disabled.  As difficult as it may be for the rest of us, it is far tougher for those with disabilities.

COVID-19 Reopening and the Disabled

For insights on this important topic, we refer to Andrew Pulrang’s article in Forbes:

People with disabilities and chronic illnesses generally tend to side with caution. For various practical reasons, they are at higher risk of getting infected. And if infected, we are far more likely to get much sicker and die from COVID-19.

So most of us probably do tend to favor more precautions and longer restrictions aimed at curbing and stamping out the pandemic. Being part of the probable collateral damage of premature ‘reopening’ makes this all so much more concrete and immediate for disabled people.

On the other hand, disabled people exhibit some affinity for the risk takers. In most situations, disabled people tend to greater willingness to take risks, not less. Otherwise, we would never accomplish anything. We understand quite intimately what it means to weigh the risks and benefits that always come with freedom and opportunity.

Recognizing, rethinking, and adjusting to risk is in many ways the core of the disability rights movement and disability culture. This is especially true for assertive advocate sand disability rights activists. The right to take risks,  often phrased as “the dignity of risk,” is very important to disabled people individually, and to the disability community as a whole.

We cherish this right to take risks all the more because most disabled people at some point in our lives have to contend with some kind of outside authority either informally or formally telling us what we can and cannot do, simply because of our disabilities.

To read more, click the image.

Reopening and the Disabled
Getty

 

Feel Better with Five-Minute Yoga

Be more energized with just a few minutes a day of yoga.

Since beginning this blog, we have presented a number of posts on the value of exercise. As well as the implications of feeling tired. To complement these discussions, we now look at yoga. In particular, how to feel better with five-minute yoga.

How to Feel Better with Five-Minute Yoga

What Is Yoga?

For those not fully aware of yoga, we turn to Asia Trend for insights:

Yoga exercises improve circulation, stimulate the abdominal organs, and put pressure on the glandular system of the body, which can generally result to better health. The five principles of yoga are the basis of attaining a healthy body and mind through the practice of yoga.

        1. Proper Relaxation
        2. Appropriate Exercise
        3. Proper Breathing
        4. Suitable Diet
        5. Positive Thinking and Meditation

Also, consider this infographic.

Feel Better with Yoga

Five-Minute Yoga

Could you really do an effective yoga routine in five minutes? According to Stephanie Mansour,  writing for CNN health, the answer is yes:

The countless hours that many of us have sat at a makeshift desk in quarantine can be detrimental — physically and mentally. Hunched over a computer day in and day out, you’re not just wreaking havoc on your posture, but you’re likely feeling out of sorts and drained, too.

If you wake up feeling stressed or overwhelmed with the thought of beginning another day in isolation, a daily yoga practice can be helpful. Practicing brief sessions of yoga and mindfulness can significantly improve energy levels and brain function.

 

Along with the physical practice of yoga, the breathwork,  has a significant positive impact on energy levels and cognitive function. Research has shown that slow, steady breathing linked with movement helps reduce stress and improve autonomic and higher neural center functioning.

 
To learn Mansour’s 5-minute yoga routine (with photos showing her suggested poses), click the image.

Feel Better with Five-Minute Yoga
Stephanie Mansour kicks off her morning with an energizing yoga routine in bed. Here she demonstrates the seated twist.