Sometimes Overlooked Cancer Causes

Be more aware of the causes of cancer.

It is imperative that we understand as much as possible about cancer. That is why we published these earlier posts: Being Smart About Your Health. Interesting Cancer Facts. And Where Cancer Rates Are Highest. Today, we look at sometimes overlooked cancer causes.

Click on the image below to see a slide show from Sharecare that focuses on nine sometimes overlooked causes of cancer:

“Symptoms may not be so obvious. Some can be dangerously deceptive even. Seemingly minor changes, like a nagging cough or persistent backache, can sometimes signal cancer. Too often, these are not taken seriously until the disease has progressed.”

“So, how can you distinguish between an innocent ache and a pain you should report to your doctor? ‘I tell patients that if there are symptoms that are out of the ordinary or persistent or frequent in nature or extreme in intensity, they should seek attention from their primary provider,” says oncologist Elwyn Cabebe, MD, of Good Samaritan Hospital in San Jose, California.”

“Signs and symptoms vary widely, so don’t hesitate to talk to your health-care provider about anything that seems out of the ordinary—especially if you notice one of these nine cancer indicators.”

Sometimes Overlooked Cancer Causes

 

How to Get and Stay Stronger

Tips to stay healthier

To get some some excellent tips about staying/getting strong, check out the links below to several recent NY Times’ articles. There should be at least one article that addresses YOUR needs.

How to Get and Stay Stronger

 

New Year’s 2019 Resolutions – Part Two

Be motivated to set and follow cancer-related New Year’s resolutions.

As we noted yesterday, we need to set meaningful resolutions so as to be better. We should do this in a positive, motivated, and continuing manner. Today, we offer New Year’s 2019 Resolutions – Part Two.

This post deals more directly with the kinds of resolutions that those of us dealing with cancer need to address.

According to the Irish Cancer Society:

“[We are] urging people to make simple lifestyle changes, as part of their New Year’s resolutions, to significantly lower their risk of cancer. Four out of ten cancer cases are preventable by making a number of lifestyle changes recommended in the European Code Against Cancer. 40% of cancer risk has been attributed to five lifestyle factors—tobacco, diet, overweight/obesity, alcohol and low physical activity.”

“The Society suggests people follow the European Code Against Cancer, which includes 12 simple steps to help reduce their risk of cancer.”

Consider the applicable steps when setting and adhering to your own personal cancer-related resolutions for 2019.

To view a larger (and more readable) version of the infographic, click the image.

New Year's 2019 Resolutions - Part Two
 

New Year’s 2019 Resolutions – Part One

Be motivated to set and follow New Year’s resolutions.

As we begin the new year, we need to set meaningful resolutions so as to be better. We should do this a positive, motivated, and continuing manner. Today, New Year’s 2019 Resolutions – Part One. Tomorrow, New Year’s 2019 Resolutions – Part Two.

Not only start 2019 by addressing your personal resolutions, but end the year by keeping to these resolutions.

Consider these 15 resolutions as described by Health Fitness Revolution.

New Year's 2019 Resolutions - Part One

 

And these 9 resolutions from UPMC Myhealth Matters.

New Year's 2019 Resolutions - Part One

 

Now, articulate YOUR OWN plan for meeting your personal resolutions as shown by Times Now News.

New Year's 2019 Resolutions - Part One
 

Living Better and Being Happier

I am thankful each and every day to celebrate the blessing of life.

As those of you who follow this blog know, I am a VERY lucky survivor of pancreatic cancer. On February 12, 2019, it will be four years since I had my successful Whipple surgery. My longevity is related to my embracing life and choosing happiness.

Today, I want to share a few FREE resources I have developed and tell my personal story. Why? To provide hope and serenity for anyone with a serious disease and their loved ones. We must never forget that our caregivers suffer and endure along with us.

Resources for Better Embracing Life and Choosing Happiness

After recovering from my surgery and follow-up chemotherapy, I view my life’s mission as assisting others with a terrible illness. To me, this is a responsibility that I welcome as one of the relatively few long-term pancreatic cancer survivors. In my mind and heart, I MUST give  back.

So, please take a look at these resources.

Surviving Cancer and Embracing Life: My Personal Journey

With this book, I want to share my personal cancer journey with you. I want to offer hope and support to those dealing with a terrible disease and their families. Why? To quote the late NY Yankee star Lou Gehrig when he was honored at Yankee Stadium while dying from ALS: “Today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth.”

The book is a hopeful, but realistic, view of my journey from diagnosis through treatment through return to work and my being able to walk my daughter down the aisle at her wedding. It has some humor and many quotes to ease the reading.

Click the book cover to download a FREE copy of the book. Then, share it with someone you love.

Embracing Life and Choosing Happiness

Living Well While Surviving Cancer

During the summer, I started a new blog to share health-related information and inspirational stories. It features infographics, videos, articles, and more. And despite the title, it relates to a wide range of health issues.

Click the image to visit the blog. Then, PLEASE sign up to follow us.

Embracing Life and Choosing Happiness

Other Resources

Finally, check out these new resources. Welcome aboard!

My Story: Live Life Every Day

In early 2015, my wonderful endocrinologist Dr. Joseph Terrana ran a routine blood test (part of my three-month testing as a diabetic). And he did not like the results. So, he sent me for an immediate CT-scan. It showed a lump in my pancreas. Soon after, I underwent 9-hour Whipple surgery by Dr. Gene Coppa of Northwell and the Hofstra Medical School. The tumor was malignant, but removed in full. After a short recuperation, I underwent six months of chemotherapy and other treatments under the supervision of Dr. Jeffrey Vacirca and his right-hand person Diana Youngs, nurse-practitioner, of NSHOA (now New York Cancer & Blood Specialists).

Why do I consider myself so lucky?

  • I was diagnosed REALLY early and had surgery shortly after. And pancreatic cancer can be a real killer because eighty percent are diagnosed too late for surgery.
  • My family and friends have been terrific every day. And I have bonded with other cancer survivors.
  • My medical team has been extraordinary. Besides being excellent professionals, they are caring and devoted. They are dedicated to making our lives as comfortable as possible.
  • I work in a profession I love. I’ve been at Hofstra University for 43 years. Except for sitting out the spring 2015 semester, I have not missed one class since since then.
  • I have a drive that encourages me to be upbeat about dealing with life’s events. Thus, I have two mantras: “Live life every day” and “Happiness is a choice.”
  • On February 12, 2019, I celebrate FOUR years since surgery. After finishing chemo in August 2015, my CT-scans have all been clean. My plan is to be around for many more years. 🙂

My personal advice:

  1. Do not avoid the doctor because you are afraid of what he/she may find.
  2. Early detection is the best way to mitigate your health problems. Have regular checkups and blood tests.
  3. Listen to the medical professionals!
  4. Surround yourself with family and friends who are supportive.
  5. Be upbeat; getting down is counter productive. [(a) When diagnosed, I set two goals: to dance at my daughter’s October 2015 wedding and to deliver a toast. Mission accomplished. I never thought these things wouldn’t happen. (b) People don’t believe me when I remark that I never said “why me”? Instead I say, “boy was I lucky to be diagnosed so early.”]
  6. Seek out your friends/acquaintances who have also dealt with cancer. They can be a wonderful resource and sounding board (when you don’t want to further burden your family).
  7. Be active. [I went to the gym while undergoing chemotherapy.]
  8. Live for tomorrow and the time thereafter. 

Losing Weight During the Holiday Season

Yes, you read the title of today’s post correctly. “Losing Weight During the Holiday Season.”

Here are several tips from a YouTube video, featuring Christina Jordan. She is a board-certified master nutritionist who used food to turn her life around and get healthy.