Reopening and the Disabled

Risks and rewards of COVID-19 behavior for the disabled.

 
A while back, during more normal times, we looked at travel and the disabled. Now, we look  at reopening and the disabled.  As difficult as it may be for the rest of us, it is far tougher for those with disabilities.

COVID-19 Reopening and the Disabled

For insights on this important topic, we refer to Andrew Pulrang’s article in Forbes:

People with disabilities and chronic illnesses generally tend to side with caution. For various practical reasons, they are at higher risk of getting infected. And if infected, we are far more likely to get much sicker and die from COVID-19.

So most of us probably do tend to favor more precautions and longer restrictions aimed at curbing and stamping out the pandemic. Being part of the probable collateral damage of premature ‘reopening’ makes this all so much more concrete and immediate for disabled people.

On the other hand, disabled people exhibit some affinity for the risk takers. In most situations, disabled people tend to greater willingness to take risks, not less. Otherwise, we would never accomplish anything. We understand quite intimately what it means to weigh the risks and benefits that always come with freedom and opportunity.

Recognizing, rethinking, and adjusting to risk is in many ways the core of the disability rights movement and disability culture. This is especially true for assertive advocate sand disability rights activists. The right to take risks,  often phrased as “the dignity of risk,” is very important to disabled people individually, and to the disability community as a whole.

We cherish this right to take risks all the more because most disabled people at some point in our lives have to contend with some kind of outside authority either informally or formally telling us what we can and cannot do, simply because of our disabilities.

To read more, click the image.

Reopening and the Disabled
Getty

 

The Prevalence of Fake News

Take a look at SIX different infographics.

Today, we address a highly controversial topic. The prevalence of fake news. Further, we recognize that “fake news” may be in the eyes or ears of the beholder. And that it amplifies our disagreements on hot button issues.

To read our prior posts related to transparency, click here.

A Topical Look at the Prevalence of Fake News

For a highly-respected source, we turn to Statista and author Christopher Ledsham:

‘Fake news’ refers to media pieces featuring sensationalized headlines. Placed alongside falsified images and claims. And typically used for propaganda purposes. The goal? To give the impression that they are from real news sources. The term was selection as Collins Dictionary’s official Word of the Year in 2017. And become a common day-to-day expression since.

Addressing the problem of fake news around the world, we produced six graphics that take a closer look at the topic’s perceptions in different countries. We present the core statements from various surveys and studies in a compact Instagram-friendly format. The style of the infographics, created by our graphic designer Sandy Geist, is characterized above all by a well-suited color palette. In the infographics, she limits herself to a handful of colors, rich in contrast. Thereby, drawing the viewer’s gaze purposefully through each image.

Thus, how should we differentiate between quality media sources and fake news? As a solution, Germany’s Federal Agency for Civic Education recommends taking the following steps in order to help distinguish real news from fake news: (1) Look closely. (2) Think for yourself. (3) Think critically. (4) Check the sources.

Below are the infographics prepared by Statista on this topic.

The Prevalence of Fake News

The Prevalence of Fake News

The Prevalence of Fake News

The Prevalence of Fake News

The Prevalence of Fake News

The Prevalence of Fake News

Don’t Forget About Giving Back

By helping others, you help yourself.

This is a difficult period for many of us. Psychologically, physically, and financially. But nonetheless, don’t forget about giving back. Nonprofits of all types need our support. It doesn’t have to be money. Donate your time as a volunteer. Participate in a fundraiser, such as a walk. Take those with no transportation to doctor visits. Or do any number of other tasks. And yes, monetary contributions help too.

Look at our other posts on this topic. And remember that both the donor and donee benefit!

Be Thankful: Don’t Forget About Giving Back

As B the Change Notes:

        • Support a small business.
        • Volunteer virtually.
        • Be mindful at the grocery store.
        • Reallocate unused funds to local charities.
        • Give blood.
        • Patronize companies that give back.
        • Share your knowledge.
        • Get takeout.
        • Check in on a neighbor.
        • Keep connecting.

Click the image to read more about each item from B the Change.

Don't Forget About Giving Back
Image from rawpixel