Health and BlogTalk Radio

These are examples of episodes already available online involving cancer and other health issues.

Another great resource for us to know about is BlogTalkRadio.¬† And we can even actively participate.¬†As its Web site notes: “Launched in 2006, BlogTalkRadio is an audio Web-based platform that allows anyone to create live and on-demand talk content on the Web. If you‚Äôre a radio broadcaster at heart,¬†BlogTalkRadio gives you the ability to go live with its Web-based ‚Äėstudio‚Äô and host¬†multi-participant broadcasts using just a¬†computer and a phone. “

One of its categories is health.
 
Health and BlogTalk Radio
 
Health and BlogTalk Radio
 
Health and BlogTalk Radio
 
Health and BlogTalk Radio
 

Apple and Stanford Partner on Smart Watch Study

For the past year, Apple and Stanford have partnered on a health research study using the Apple Watch.

This important study is huge.

As Nicky Lineaweaver reports for Business Insider:

“Apple and Stanford Medicine enrolled more than¬†400,000 participants in the Apple Heart Study since its¬†launch¬†in November of 2017 ‚ÄĒ making it the largest study on atrial fibrillation (AFib) ever conducted. The study will help Apple explore how its Watch can be used to identify AFib, a common type of irregular heartbeat that heightens the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease.”

“AFib costs the U.S. around $6 billion annually, and is responsible for about 130,000 deaths and 750,000 hospitalizations in the US every year, the CDC¬†reports. And AFib detection has been one of Apple’s strategic focuses in healthcare thus far ‚ÄĒ the tech giant released¬†the Watch Series 4 with an FDA-cleared AFib detection feature in September, for example.”

The Stanford Medicine site notes:

“The Apple Heart Study app uses data from Apple Watch to identify irregular heart rhythms, including those from potentially serious heart conditions such as atrial fibrillation. Apple is conducting this research study in collaboration with Stanford Medicine to improve the technology used to detect and analyze irregular heart rhythms, like atrial fibrillation – a leading cause of stroke.”

Click the image to learn more about the study.

Apple and Stanford Partner on Smart Watch Study
 

Best Practices to Improve Reporting of Patient Safety Concerns

University of Cambridge and Johns Hopkins Medicine looked at what prevented employees from raising patient safety concerns.

Too often, patient safety concerns about their care in medical facilities has gone unreported or under-reported. In response, there is new research about how to fix this.

As Johns Hopkins reports:

“In a case study published online last week in¬†Academic Medicine,¬†an international team of researchers led by the University of Cambridge and Johns Hopkins Medicine looked at what prevented employees from raising concerns. The study identifies measures to help health care organizations encourage their employees to speak up and recommends a systematic approach to promoting employee voice that appears to have already made a positive impact at Johns Hopkins.”

‚ÄúIt‚Äôs not enough just to say you‚Äôre committed to employee voice. Health care staff must genuinely feel comfortable speaking up if organizations are going to provide safe, high-quality care,‚ÄĚ says Mary Dixon-Woods, D.Phil., M.Sc., a professor at the University of Cambridge, director of THIS Institute (The Healthcare Improvement Studies Institute) and the study‚Äôs lead author. ‚ÄúEven when reporting mechanisms are in place, employees may not report disruptive behaviors if they don‚Äôt feel safe in doing so and don‚Äôt think their concerns will be addressed.‚ÄĚ

“Because health-care workers often are reluctant to raise concerns about co-workers and unsafe behaviors, leadership at Johns Hopkins Medicine sought to encourage employee voice in the organization by first identifying barriers.¬†To address the issues raised in these interviews, Johns Hopkins leaders developed, implemented, and in some cases expanded a series of interventions from fall 2014 through summer 2016. These interventions included clear definitions of acceptable and unacceptable behavior, well-coordinated reporting mechanisms, leadership training on having difficult conversations, and consistent consequences for disruptive behaviors.”

 

Click the image to read more.
Best Practices to Improve Reporting of Patient Concerns
Credit: iStock

 

Where Cancer Rates Are Highest

Today, we look at cancer rates by country.

Yesterday, we cited some interesting cancer facts. Now, let’s look at cancer rates by country. And there are some surprises!

As reported by Evan Comen for 24/7 Wall Street:

“About 1 in every 6 deaths on the planet is due to cancer, the second leading cause of death worldwide. In the United States alone, the cost of cancer care amounts to approximately $157 billion in medical expenditures per year. As the global population ages, the prevalence of cancer is likely to increase. So will the costs of care as more advanced, expensive treatments become the medical standard.”

“Correlated with factors like age, income, and health behaviors, the incidence of cancer varies heavily around the world. The quality of medical treatment and access to health care is worse in poorer, developing nations. Yet, age is the main risk factor for cancer. And many countries with high incidence of cancer are wealthy, developed nations with high life expectancy.”

“To determine the countries with the highest incidence of new cancer cases, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the estimated age-adjusted new cancer diagnosis rates for 185 countries in 2018 with data from the World Health Organization‚Äôs International Agency for Research on Cancer.”

Here are the ten countries with the highest cancer rates in this analysis [Note: These countries have high life expectancies, and thus, many older residents.]:

  1. Australia — cancer diagnosis rate = 468.0 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth =¬†82.5 years.
  2. New Zealand— cancer diagnosis rate =¬†438.1 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth =¬†81.6 years.
  3. Ireland— cancer diagnosis rate =¬†373.7 new cases per 100,000 people;
    life expectancy at birth = 81.6 years.
  4. Hungary — cancer diagnosis rate =¬†368.1 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth = 75.6 years.
  5. United States — cancer diagnosis rate =¬†352.2 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth =¬†78.7 years.
  6. ¬†Belgium — cancer diagnosis rate =¬†345.8 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth =¬†81.0 years.
  7. France— cancer diagnosis rate =¬†344.1 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth =¬†82.3 years.
  8. Denmark — cancer diagnosis rate =¬†340.4 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth =¬†80.7 years.
  9. Norway — cancer diagnosis rate =¬†337.8 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth =¬†82.5 years.
  10. Netherlands — cancer diagnosis rate =¬†334.1 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth = 81.5 years.

Click the image of Croatia to see the other 15 countries on 24/7 Wall St.’s list.

Where Cancer Rates Are Highest

 

Interesting Cancer Facts

Let’s look at lesser-known cancer facts.

There’s still a lot that we do not know about cancer. Today, we look at several “surprising” cancer facts. As 24/7 Wall St. notes:

“No place is immune to cancer. And nearly everyone is familiar with the disease in one form or another. We have learned much about cancer. Yet there is much more still to learn.”

“To identify the most surprising facts about cancer, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed recent reports released by the American Cancer Society, National Cancer Institute, Cancer Atlas, and World Health Organization. We opted for generally less well-known facts.”

These are among the 20 facts cited:

  • “What many may not know is that there are more than 100 different kinds of cancer, many of which the typical American has never heard of. The name of each type of cancer typically includes the organ or tissues where the cancer developed. In some cases, the cancer is named for the type of cell that forms it.”
  • “Age is the largest risk factor for cancer. According to the NCI Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, the median age of cancer diagnosis is 66 years. The American Cancer Society reports that 87% of cancer cases in the United States are diagnosed in people 50 years and over.”
  • “According to the NCI, about 38.4% of men and women in the U.S. will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their life. The most commonly diagnosed cancers so far in 2018 have been breast, lung and bronchus, prostate, colon and rectum, and melanoma of the skin cancers.”
  • “The World Health Organization estimates that 447,000 people will be diagnosed with cancer in 2018. Most of the new cancer cases will occur in Western countries, the country with the highest cancer rate is Australia. In Australia, an estimated 468 people out of every 100,000 people will get cancer. New Zealand has the second highest cancer rate at roughly 438 new cases annually per 100,000 people.”¬†
  • “Scientists believe cancer is not caused by just one single cause but by the interaction of many factors. Still, there are several factors known to significantly increase the risk of cancer. According to the ACS Cancer Atlas, between one-third and one-half of all cancer cases worldwide are preventable. Lifestyle factors such as smoking regularly, eating a high-fat diet, and working with toxic chemicals are top risk factors. Other factors include obesity, vaccine-preventable infections, and pollution.

Click the image to read more.

Interesting Cancer Facts
Source: Motortion / iStock

 

International Health Efficiency Scores

Click the image to learn more about the health-efficiency index and to see the latest index rankings. The United States is tied for 54th!

The United States annually spends more than $9,500 per person for health care. Nonetheless, the effectiveness of this spending lags far behind many other nations (that spend a lot less).

According to a recent Bloomberg report:

“Want medical care without quickly draining your fortune? Try Singapore or Hong Kong as your healthy havens.¬†The U.S. will cost you the most for treatment, both in absolute terms and relative to average incomes. Yet, the life expectancy of Americans — about 79 years — was exceeded by more than 25 countries and territories, according to an annual¬†Bloomberg analysis¬†in almost 200 economies.”¬†

“A health-efficiency index was then created to rank those with average lifespans of at least 70 years, GDP per-capita exceeding $5,000 and a minimum population of 5 million. And¬†Americans aren’t getting their medical money‚Äôs worth, according to each of the categories.”¬†

“The U.S. had the second-highest per-capita spending on health care at $9,536. Switzerland‚Äôs average based on gross domestic product was $9,818. But that $282 supplement helped deliver an extra 4.2 years of life — with the average Swiss lifespan of almost 83.”

Click the image to learn more about the health-efficiency index and to see the latest index rankings. The United States is tied for 54th!

International Health Efficiency Scores