Patient Actions Improving Doctor Relationships

How patients can enhance doctor relationships

Earlier this month, I gave a presentation to about 65 residents and other doctors on “Roles in Patient-Doctor Relationships: Seeing Both Sides.”

This is the fifth post:

In the doctor-patient relationship, what can patients do to enhance communications? After all, it is not all on the doctor to make the relationship work.

Check out the chart below, and these highlights from the chart:

Patients need to see doctors regularly. And not wait until it is too late. Early diagnosis is a big plus for continued good health.

Patients must always be truthful. Also, they always should come prepared (such as having a list of the prescriptions taken).

Patients should not ask for harmful medications.

Patients need to thoroughly understand treatment options and make informed decisions.

Patient Actions Improving Doctor Relationships
 

Doctor Actions Improving Patient Relationships

How doctors can enhance patient relationships

Earlier this month, I gave a presentation to about 65 residents and other doctors on “Roles in Patient-Doctor Relationships: Seeing Both Sides.”

This is the fourth post:

In the doctor-patient relationship, what can doctors do to enhance communications?

Check out the chart below, and these highlights from the chart:

Doctors need to show positive body language, such as not hanging in the doorway.  This shows less respect for the patient.

Studies show that the simple act of a doctor’s sitting, makes patients feel much better. They like being on the same physical level. And they tend to believe the doctor is with them longer than he/she actually is.

Doctors should allow their patients to speak uninterrupted. Studies show that, typically,  doctors interrupt patients within 11-18 seconds!!  

The doctor should always leave the patient with some hope, even when a prognosis is poor.

Doctor Actions Improving Patient Relationships
 

Doctors’ Roles and Responsibilities

See what doctors’ jobs encompass. With video.

Earlier this month, I gave a presentation to about 65 residents and other doctors at the Queens Hospital Center in Jamaica, New York. The topic? “Roles in Patient-Doctor Relationships: Seeing Both Sides”

Over the next several posts, various aspects of that talk will be highlighted:

      • Doctors’ Roles and Responsibilities (including doctor morale)
      • Patients’ Roles and Responsibilities (and what doctors wish patients knew)
      • Stages of Patient Frustration and Satisfaction
      • Doctor Actions Improving Patient Relationships
      • Patient Actions Improving Doctor Relationships
      • We’re Not There Yet on Doctor-Patient Relationships

Doctors typically have the roles and responsibilities highlighted in this image. How do YOU rate each of your doctors across these roles and responsibilities?

Doctors' Roles and Responsibilities

As patients, it is also vital for us to understand the factors that may affect our doctors’ performance. This video shows a few such factors.

Do You Think Your Doctors Are Caring?

A checklist that you could use to rate your doctors.

A few months ago, we featured a YouTube video on doctors and compassion. In that video, it was reported that a doctor could show compassion in less than a minute.

Today, we ask: Do you think your doctors are caring?

As part of a research project, Mark E. Quirk, et al., devised the following checklist. How would EACH of your doctors score on the checklist? If a doctor’s score is low, why don’t you switch to another physician?

Do You Think Your Doctor Is Caring?
 

Leading Jobs in The Health Care Field

Hot health care jobs

Job Site Glassdoor recently published its annual 50 Best Jobs in America for 2019.

As we might expect, a number of these jobs are in the health care field. Here are these jobs with their job title, median base salary, and level of job satisfaction (out of 5):

#2 — Nursing Manager; $83,000; 4/5

#4 — Occupational Therapist; $74,000; 4/5

#12 — Physician Assistant; $105,000; 3.7/5

#19 — Speech Language Pathologist; $72,000; 3.7/5

#30 — Dental Hygienist; $67,250; 4.5/5

#32 — Nurse Practitioner; $102,000; 3.5/5

#37 — Physical Therapist; $70,000; 3.6/5

#41 — Radiologic Technologist;  $48,000; 4/5

Click the image to learn more. And to see numerous current job listings by job title.

Leading Jobs in The Health Care Field
CREDIT: Getty Images

 

Tips for Seniors – Part 1

19 FREE services for seniors.

Today, we look at the kinds of free services available for seniors. Tomorrow, we consider the best places to retire. These are both important topics for many of us.

Are you aware of the nonprofit SeniorNet? Click the image to access its blog.

One of the more valuable posts at SeniorNet’s blog is “19 Free Services for Seniors or Their Caregivers.” As Tony Rovere of Agingcare.com notes:

“Most seniors these days are living on limited incomes from sources that may include Social Security, a small pension, or maybe some other form of government assistance. With few resources at their disposal, finding services for free or discounted prices is vital. There are likely many of these types of services available through your local Office for the Aging (the name of this government agency may be different in your local area, i.e. Division of Senior Services) or local charities such as Lions Club or Meals-on-Wheels, or on the Internet through sites like ElderCare.gov.”

“However, in my opinion, the most rewarding of these freebies for seniors and their caregivers – things like free hearing aids and free dentures – will be more difficult to come by. From my experiences as a caregiver, I have compiled a list of these types of services and provided a roadmap and examples for how to find them.”

Click here to see the 19 free services. 
 

Live Life Every Day

Today, I am quite sad. More on that shortly.

In our blog, we have focused on the journeys of people with serious health issues. And sought to be inspiring through posts such as these: 

Why I am Sad Today

Over the weekend, the female half of one of my closest and dearest couples passed away. She was the same age as me. And she dealt with a plethora of health issues over the years. As has her husband. This post is in honor of them both. She suffered greatly. And as a survivor of a long-time marriage, he is suffering a lot now. They have been the NICEST  people I know.

Understand that you are in my heart and head. And always will be. The fond memories will not fade away. Rest in peace. 

Yet, we know that life goes on and that we must treasure each day, because we can be snatched away suddenly. As we’ve noted before: Try not to “throw away” any days. They are precious.

That’s why I find Tim McGraw’s “Live Like You Were Dying” (written by Craig Michael Wiseman, James Timothy Nichols, and Tim Nichols) to be so inspirational. Even though the specific lyrics of the song mostly do not apply to me, the focus is on living life every day:
 

He said:
“I was in my early forties
With a lot of life before me
And a moment came that stopped me on a dime
I spent most of the next days
Looking at the x-rays
Talkin’ ’bout the options
And talkin’ ’bout sweet time”

 

I asked him:
“When it sank in
That this might really be the real end
How’s it hit you
When you get that kind of news?
Man, what’d you do?”

 

He said:
“I went skydiving
I went Rocky Mountain climbing
I went 2.7 seconds on a bull named Fumanchu
And I loved deeper
And I spoke sweeter
And I gave forgiveness I’d been denying”

 

And he said:
“Someday I hope you get the chance
To live like you were dying”

 

He said:
“I was finally the husband
That most of the time I wasn’t
And I became a friend a friend would like to have
And all of a sudden going fishin’
Wasn’t such an imposition
And I went three times that year I lost my dad
I finally read the Good Book, and I
Took a good, long, hard look
At what I’d do if I could do it all again.”