Best U.S. States in Which to Live

The quality of resident livability varies greatly by state.

Even so, we tend to live where we feel most comfortable. 🙂

As recently reported by Cheyenne Buckingham and Grant Suneson for 24/7 Wall St.:

“Each state has advantages and shortcomings. Often, Americans live in the state they grew up in because it is familiar and feels like home. Other personal factors are often behind why people live in a certain state. However, there are more objective factors that drive people to — or away from — a certain state, and can be used to help assess just how livable a state is.”

“These factors include an area’s economy, job market, crime rate, health care, and more. Sometimes the best way of measuring these factors is to look at an outcome that best reflects the combined effects of living in a state. For example, differences in life expectancy between states can be caused by everything from differences in the regional quality of health care to the differences in state education systems and economies, which also can make a difference in health outcomes.”

“To identify America’s best states to live in, 24/7 Wall St. ranked states based on an index of three factors — life expectancy at birth, the bachelor’s degree attainment rate among adults, and the poverty rate. While there are many different measures, these three collectively are an effective way to sum up quality of life in a state in terms of health and prosperity.”

These are the top ten states in which to live. Click here to read about all 50 states.

  1. Massachusetts
  2. New Hampshire
  3. Connecticut
  4. Colorado
  5. Minnesota
  6. New Jersey
  7. Hawaii
  8. Maryland
  9. Vermont
  10. Utah

Interesting which states are in not in the 10 top!!! California, Florida, New York, and Texas

Why is Massachusetts number one?

“Adults are the best educated in the country, as 43.4% hold at least a bachelor’s degree. This sets these residents up for higher paying positions in their career. Massachusetts has the fourth highest median household income, at $77,385 a year. The state’s poverty rate of 10.5% is well below the U.S. rate. Massachusetts also has some of the best health outcomes in the country, possibly because residents are the most likely to have health insurance.”

Best U.S. States in Which to Live
Source: DenisTangneyJr / Getty Images

 

Do Not Make These Thanksgiving Mistakes

Getting ready for the biggest family gathering of the year next Thursday? To have a very Happy Thanksgiving, there are some things we should keep in mind.

Keep up your good spirits. And be healthful while celebrating.

As Hristina Byrnes reports for 24/7 Wall St.:

“A typical Thanksgiving dinner can amount to 3,000 calories. Appetizers and drinks before, during, and after the meal can add another 1,500. That brings the total to a whopping 4,500 calories in just a few hours. This is about twice the amount a person should consume in a day.”

“Yes, Thanksgiving is about family and food. But some people drink a lot, too. The combination of too many liquid and food calories can lead to drowsiness, upset stomachs, and headaches the next morning from both the alcohol and the high sugar foods, according to Alyson Pidich, medical director of the Ash Center, a longevity and anti-aging clinic in New York City.”

“To determine the biggest and most common health mistakes people make on Thanksgiving, 24/7 Wall St. asked several doctors, nutritionists, and dietitians to share their observations and tips.”

These are a few of the tips:

  • Sitting on the couch after dinner— Your posture affects how your body digests all the food you consume. Research shows that the best position to avoid discomfort is standing. Lying down significantly slows gastric emptying compared to other positions such as sitting, standing, or a combination of sitting and standing. A separate study found that food takes about 20 minutes longer to leave the stomach if you’re sitting.”
  • Being in a hurry to prepare the meal — Being in a hurry to prepare the meal and visit with family is a common mistake. It’s a mistake because it leaves no time for exercising. Working out should be part of your holiday ‘recovery.’ You have to keep the body in motion to keep the metabolism going.”
  • Skipping the vegetables — Consuming vegetables is crucial because they are low in calories and have a lot vitamins and minerals. The fiber and water in them fill you up more efficiently than processed carbs in bread and mashed potatoes. A spoonful of mashed potatoes may be between 50 and 100 calories, while a spoonful of Brussel sprouts is just five. If you want to eat but not gain weight, you need to consume low-energy-dense foods — a big volume of food with a low amount of calories. This way you feel fuller on just a few calories.”

Click the image for further tips.

Do Not Make These Thanksgiving Mistakes
Source: itakdalee / Getty Images

 
 

Where Cancer Rates Are Highest

Today, we look at cancer rates by country.

Yesterday, we cited some interesting cancer facts. Now, let’s look at cancer rates by country. And there are some surprises!

As reported by Evan Comen for 24/7 Wall Street:

“About 1 in every 6 deaths on the planet is due to cancer, the second leading cause of death worldwide. In the United States alone, the cost of cancer care amounts to approximately $157 billion in medical expenditures per year. As the global population ages, the prevalence of cancer is likely to increase. So will the costs of care as more advanced, expensive treatments become the medical standard.”

“Correlated with factors like age, income, and health behaviors, the incidence of cancer varies heavily around the world. The quality of medical treatment and access to health care is worse in poorer, developing nations. Yet, age is the main risk factor for cancer. And many countries with high incidence of cancer are wealthy, developed nations with high life expectancy.”

“To determine the countries with the highest incidence of new cancer cases, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the estimated age-adjusted new cancer diagnosis rates for 185 countries in 2018 with data from the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer.”

Here are the ten countries with the highest cancer rates in this analysis [Note: These countries have high life expectancies, and thus, many older residents.]:

  1. Australia — cancer diagnosis rate = 468.0 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth = 82.5 years.
  2. New Zealand— cancer diagnosis rate = 438.1 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth = 81.6 years.
  3. Ireland— cancer diagnosis rate = 373.7 new cases per 100,000 people;
    life expectancy at birth = 81.6 years.
  4. Hungary — cancer diagnosis rate = 368.1 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth = 75.6 years.
  5. United States — cancer diagnosis rate = 352.2 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth = 78.7 years.
  6.  Belgium — cancer diagnosis rate = 345.8 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth = 81.0 years.
  7. France— cancer diagnosis rate = 344.1 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth = 82.3 years.
  8. Denmark — cancer diagnosis rate = 340.4 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth = 80.7 years.
  9. Norway — cancer diagnosis rate = 337.8 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth = 82.5 years.
  10. Netherlands — cancer diagnosis rate = 334.1 new cases per 100,000 people; life expectancy at birth = 81.5 years.

Click the image of Croatia to see the other 15 countries on 24/7 Wall St.’s list.

Where Cancer Rates Are Highest

 

Interesting Cancer Facts

Let’s look at lesser-known cancer facts.

There’s still a lot that we do not know about cancer. Today, we look at several “surprising” cancer facts. As 24/7 Wall St. notes:

“No place is immune to cancer. And nearly everyone is familiar with the disease in one form or another. We have learned much about cancer. Yet there is much more still to learn.”

“To identify the most surprising facts about cancer, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed recent reports released by the American Cancer Society, National Cancer Institute, Cancer Atlas, and World Health Organization. We opted for generally less well-known facts.”

These are among the 20 facts cited:

  • “What many may not know is that there are more than 100 different kinds of cancer, many of which the typical American has never heard of. The name of each type of cancer typically includes the organ or tissues where the cancer developed. In some cases, the cancer is named for the type of cell that forms it.”
  • “Age is the largest risk factor for cancer. According to the NCI Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, the median age of cancer diagnosis is 66 years. The American Cancer Society reports that 87% of cancer cases in the United States are diagnosed in people 50 years and over.”
  • “According to the NCI, about 38.4% of men and women in the U.S. will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their life. The most commonly diagnosed cancers so far in 2018 have been breast, lung and bronchus, prostate, colon and rectum, and melanoma of the skin cancers.”
  • “The World Health Organization estimates that 447,000 people will be diagnosed with cancer in 2018. Most of the new cancer cases will occur in Western countries, the country with the highest cancer rate is Australia. In Australia, an estimated 468 people out of every 100,000 people will get cancer. New Zealand has the second highest cancer rate at roughly 438 new cases annually per 100,000 people.” 
  • “Scientists believe cancer is not caused by just one single cause but by the interaction of many factors. Still, there are several factors known to significantly increase the risk of cancer. According to the ACS Cancer Atlas, between one-third and one-half of all cancer cases worldwide are preventable. Lifestyle factors such as smoking regularly, eating a high-fat diet, and working with toxic chemicals are top risk factors. Other factors include obesity, vaccine-preventable infections, and pollution.

Click the image to read more.

Interesting Cancer Facts
Source: Motortion / iStock