Best Health News Stories of the 2010s

Health advances of the 2010s

As we confront the ramifications of the coronavirus, we also have to consider the overall state of healthcare. [We will have a post on the coronavirus in the near future. We’ve been waiting to get more clarity, rather than make comments based on conjecture.]

Sometimes, when we’re feeling let down by the health care system, we need to also read about good news. Thus, today’s post: Best Health News Stories of the 2010s.

According to 24/7 Wall St., here are 15 of the top health news stories of the past decade, MOSTLY good: 

“The 2010s will go down in history as a decade of many newsworthy health-related stories, many of which are not good news — Ebola, measles, antibiotic resistance. But the years since 2010 were not all bad. Many good things happened, too, and some of them will have a lasting effect for generations to come. 24/7 Tempo went through multiple news archives. We read dozens of articles published since 2010 and selected 15 of the most positive health news that made headlines.”

“Some of the most talked about stories over the last few years have influenced health guidelines, treatment of serious disease, and even government policy. Reports of significant research developments in the treatment and prevention of chronic and other conditions gave hope to millions of Americans. Some of the good news broke as recently just a few months ago .”

Here are the 15 – in chronological order from earliest to latest. Click the link above to read a lot more.

        • CT scans in high risk patients to reduce overall lung cancer mortality
        • Melanoma drug approved
        • Gene editing now possible
        • FDA reports trans fat should not be considered ‘safe’
        • HIV prevention pill
        • New way to treat cavities
        • 3D printing of human organs
        • Immunotherapy and cancer
        • Opioid crisis recognized as national public health emergency
        • Early-stage Alzheimer’s treatment
        • Smoking rates at all-time low
        • Cystic fibrosis treatment approved by FDA
        • Second HIV patient goes into remission
        • Blood test detects breast cancer 5 years early
        • Finding a cure for arthritis

Unfortunately, the one negative story out of the 15 involves the opioid epidemic.
 

Best States for Retirement

Would you believe Alaska is ranked first?

Last month, we pointed out the best community in each state in which to retire. Today, we look at how the states themselves rank as places for retirees to live.

According to Michael B. Sauter, reporting for 24/7 Wall St.:  

“As the baby boomer generation continues to age, millions of Americans are due for retirement. Every day, about 10,000 U.S. residents turn 65. However, a record number of people 65 and older remain in the workforce because of financial insecurity. The number of seniors who continue to work has more than doubled since 2000.”

“Many seniors do not have the luxury of choosing where to spend their retirement. This could be because they depend on younger family members or because relocating costs too much. Those who choose to exit the workforce and rely on their savings, pensions, and social security face different financial burdens depending on the state where they spend their golden years.”

In one state, a retired couple can live comfortably on $36,000 a year. In another state, the same standard of living costs as much as $56,000. A person who retires at 65 and lives 20 more years could need an extra half a million dollars for living expenses depending on which state they are in.”

“To determine what it costs to retire in every state, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed annual expenses at the state level. We then reviewed data from the Economic Policy Institute’s Family Budget Calculator for a couple 65 or older with no dependents, which measures the income a family needs in order to attain a modest standard of living at the metropolitan level. Using differences in budgetary needs between the average American and residents 65 and over, 24/7 Wall St. calculated the average annual retirement costs by state.”

Click here to access the ranking of all 50 states, starting with number 50.

Below is the 24/7 Wall St. analysis of New York.

Best States for Retirement
Source: Tomas Sereda / Getty Images

3. New York
> Estimated annual retirement costs: $50,321
> Avg. annual earnings for 65+ households: $29,018 (13th highest)
> Avg. annual homeownership costs for seniors: $21,648 (4th highest)
> Pct. residents 65+: 15.9% (25th lowest)

 

Tips for Seniors – Part 2

Where’s the best place to retire?

Yesterday, we looked at the kinds of free services available for seniors. Today, we consider the best places to retire. These are both important topics for many of us.

In December, we examined the best states in which to live. Below, we specifically consider the best locales for people to live in retirement.

Recently, 24/7 Wall St. did research on this very issue. It was important enough to be reprinted in USA TodayAs  noted by Thomas C. Frohlich for 24/7 Wall St.:

“Americans spend decades preparing for retirement, which is seen by many as a well-earned break following nearly a lifetime of work. According to the National Institute on Aging, by 2030, 20% of the U.S. pop will be comprised of elderly Americans, climbing from 15% in 2015.”

“The most common reason for retiring is the desire to spend more time with family, followed by the desire to do something different, health issues, and dissatisfaction with work. Other reasons have less to do with personal preference, and more to do with factors related to aging and location. Because of the medical, social, and financial consequences of entering old age, life can change dramatically in retirement. While retirees are among the least apt group of Americans to be poor, they typically rely on fixed and reduced incomes, and the cost burdens of housing and medical care, in particular, tend to go up substantially.”

“To identify the best place to retire in every state, 24/7 Wall St. created an index of 17 health and economic factors in U.S. counties and areas considered equivalent to counties by the U.S. Census Bureau, including parishes and boroughs. Only counties where the 65-and-over population grew at least as fast as the nation and was larger than the national average were considered.”

Below is one of the best places to live, Plumas County, California — along with the highlights of why it is a great spot for retirees. CLICK HERE  to see the full list by state.

Best Places to Live in Retirement
Source: kenlund / Flickr

California: Plumas County
> Population: 18,724
> 65 and older population: 25.8% (4th of 58 counties)
> Primary care physicians: 96.0 per 100,000
> Est. monthly living expenses for family of 2: $4,201.70 (32nd out of 58 counties)
> Median home value: $228,900