Next-Generation Nurses

Why nurses are great!!

Earlier this year, we reported some of the results of  the state of the U.S. healthcare system by  Wolters Kluwer.  But what about the state of U.S. nursing? That’s today’s discussion.

Wolters Kluwer on Next-Generation Nurses

Although the survey was done pre-COVID-19,  this report from Wolters Kluwer references the impact of COVID-19.  Let’s present a few highlights:

Social distancing. Panic buying. Flattening the curve. Those are some of the expressions we started using at the beginning of 2020.

And even though the lives of nurses across the world have changed dramatically — perhaps permanently — since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the words we use to describe nurses are still the same: Resilient. Selfless. Powerful.

Nurses are the true heroes who serve on the front lines of patient care. They bring not only care but also hope to patients in need. Even at times of great personal risk and under sometimes suboptimal conditions, the world’s nurses unite in a common mission to defeat an invisible enemy. And they have been at patients’ bedsides despite the lack of hospital equipment, the under preparedness, and in many cases, the necessary protective gear.

The survey results yield insights based on the views of a group of next- generation nurses (in practice less than 10 years) who are tuned in to today’s rapidly changing healthcare system. The responses reveal those nurses’ confidence and social savvy—qualities that are certainly helping them navigate the perils of the pandemic and that are also making them the best poised to navigate changing care models.

The survey results also show that these nurses are making their mark.  They’re bringing a new perspective on such topics as societal needs, the patient’s role in care, technology, the opioid crisis, and continuing education for nurses.

It’s become a very different world, but we hope we can learn from the generational characteristics of this committed group of nurses, who are among the best positioned to sustain the profession while becoming key architects of what the future healthcare system might look like.

Click the image to see the full report. A free signup is required.


 

A New Advance in Cancer Testing

Liquid biopsy testing for undetected cancers.

We have written before about the unfortunate existence of genetic testing scams. But today, we share good news about a new advance in cancer testing.

Finding Undiagnosed Careers: A New Advance in Cancer Testing

According to Amy Mone of Johns Hopkins University, writing for Futurity:

A liquid biopsy test can safely detect as many as 26 undiagnosed cancers, according to a study of 9,900 women with no evidence or history of cancer. The findings show the test could be incorporated into routine clinical care in combination with conventional screening.

Overall, the blood test detected 26 cancers. While standard screening such as mammography or colonoscopy detected an additional 24 cancers. Together, screen-detected cancers (those detected through either blood testing or standard screening), accounted for more than half of the 96 cancers detected during the study period.

Diagnostic PET-CT most often localized cancers the new test detected. Surgeons could remove 12 of the cancers the blood test detected.

Researchers at the Ludwig Center at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, who developed the blood test, say the study, called DETECT-A (Detecting cancers Earlier Through Elective mutation-based blood Collection and Testing) represents the first time researchers used any liquid biopsy blood test clinically to screen for cancer in a population without previously detected cancer for the purpose of diagnosis and intervention—specifically treatment with the intent to cure cancer.

Click the image to read more from Mone. 

A New Advance in Cancer Testing

 

Rewarding Our Brains to Break Bad Habits

Two non-threatening animations from Dr. Jud

On Monday, we presented an infographic to help reduce anxiety. PLEASE take a look.

Now, we offer a brief discussion and two clever videos on changing bad habits by Jud Brewer, M.D., Ph.D.: “Dr. Jud [as he is called] is the Director of Research and Innovation at the Mindfulness Center and associate professor in psychiatry at the School of Medicine at Brown University, as well as a research affiliate at MIT.”

As per Dr. Jud:

“How are habits formed? What is the biggest secret behind our mind’s choices? Why is it so hard to break some of our most unhelpful habits, including worry and panic during this challenging time? How can we upgrade our mind’s habit system?”

Video 1: The Habit Loop — Anxiety

The first animation deals with the three stages of the habit loop: trigger->behavior->reward.

Video 2: Breaking Bad Habits

The second animation notes some recent research that Dr. Jud’s lab has done to help people quit smoking and stop overeating. And it provides simple tips on how you can learn to leverage your own brain for habit change.