Perspectives on Facing Dementia

Best practices to reduce odds of getting dementia

As a 70 year old, one of the scariest words to me is “dementia.” So, how can we deal with it better?

According to the National Institute on Aging:

“Dementia is the loss of cognitive functioning — thinking, remembering, and reasoning — and behavioral abilities to such an extent that it interferes with a person’s daily life and activities. These functions include memory, language skills, visual perception, problem solving, self-management, and the ability to focus and pay attention. Some people with dementia cannot control their emotions, and their personalities may change. Dementia ranges in severity from the mildest stage, when it is just beginning to affect a person’s functioning, to the most severe stage, when the person must depend completely on others for basic activities of living.”

This does sound pretty scary, right? BUT:While dementia is more common as people grow older (up to half of all people age 85 or older may have some form of dementia), it is not a normal part of aging. Many people live into their 90s and beyond without any signs of dementia.”

To learn more, visit these resources:

The last of these resources, highlights a recent research study that found:

“In all, nearly half of respondents to the National Poll on Healthy Aging felt they were likely to develop dementia as they aged, and nearly as many worried about this prospect. [The poll asked 1,028 adults ages 50 to 64 a range of brain health questions.] In reality, research suggests that less than 20 percent of people who have reached age 65 will go on to lose cognitive ability from Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, or other conditions.

“Despite the brain-related concerns of so many respondents, only 5 percent of the entire group, and 10 percent of those who said they had a family history of dementia, said they had talked with a health care provider about how to prevent memory problems.”

“The poll shows that a greater percentage of adults in their 50s and early 60s who say they get adequate sleep and exercise, eat healthily, and are active socially at least several times a week felt their memory was just as sharp now as it was when they were younger, compared to those who do not engage in these healthy behaviors as frequently. But those who said their health was fair or poor, or who reported that they didn’t often engage in healthy lifestyle practices, were much more likely to say that their memory had declined since their younger years. In all, 59 percent of poll respondents said their memory was slightly worse than it used to be.”

“For anyone who wants to stay as sharp as possible as they age, the evidence is clear: Focus on your diet, your exercise, your sleep, and your blood pressure. Don’t focus on worrying about what might happen, or the products you can buy that promise to help, but rather focus on what you can do now that research has proven to help.”

Perspectives on Facing Dementia
Credit: Getty Images

 

Numerous Health-Related Videos

How to be healthier.

Today, we feature four valuable health-related videos. We hope you find them valuable. 🙂

12 Health Problems Your Hands Are Warning You About
11 Signs of Health Problems Hidden On Your Face
10 Benefits Of Exercise On The Brain And Body – Why You Need Exercise
How to Implement a Healthy Lifestyle | Setting Habits & Wellness Goals


 

Be Healthy By Exercising

Simple exercising hints.

As we have noted before, exercising is a great way to improve our health. For example, see: Staying Fit and Living LongerIncrease Your Energy When You’re Too Tired to WorkoutRuth Bader Ginsburg: A Role Model for Those with Major Illnesses. Today, let’s look at another valuable infographic.

It is from Kaiser Permanente.

Be Healthy By Exercising
 

How to Get and Stay Stronger

Tips to stay healthier

To get some some excellent tips about staying/getting strong, check out the links below to several recent NY Times’ articles. There should be at least one article that addresses YOUR needs.

How to Get and Stay Stronger

 

New Year’s 2019 Resolutions – Part Two

Be motivated to set and follow cancer-related New Year’s resolutions.

As we noted yesterday, we need to set meaningful resolutions so as to be better. We should do this in a positive, motivated, and continuing manner. Today, we offer New Year’s 2019 Resolutions – Part Two.

This post deals more directly with the kinds of resolutions that those of us dealing with cancer need to address.

According to the Irish Cancer Society:

“[We are] urging people to make simple lifestyle changes, as part of their New Year’s resolutions, to significantly lower their risk of cancer. Four out of ten cancer cases are preventable by making a number of lifestyle changes recommended in the European Code Against Cancer. 40% of cancer risk has been attributed to five lifestyle factors—tobacco, diet, overweight/obesity, alcohol and low physical activity.”

“The Society suggests people follow the European Code Against Cancer, which includes 12 simple steps to help reduce their risk of cancer.”

Consider the applicable steps when setting and adhering to your own personal cancer-related resolutions for 2019.

To view a larger (and more readable) version of the infographic, click the image.

New Year's 2019 Resolutions - Part Two
 

New Year’s 2019 Resolutions – Part One

Be motivated to set and follow New Year’s resolutions.

As we begin the new year, we need to set meaningful resolutions so as to be better. We should do this a positive, motivated, and continuing manner. Today, New Year’s 2019 Resolutions – Part One. Tomorrow, New Year’s 2019 Resolutions – Part Two.

Not only start 2019 by addressing your personal resolutions, but end the year by keeping to these resolutions.

Consider these 15 resolutions as described by Health Fitness Revolution.

New Year's 2019 Resolutions - Part One

 

And these 9 resolutions from UPMC Myhealth Matters.

New Year's 2019 Resolutions - Part One

 

Now, articulate YOUR OWN plan for meeting your personal resolutions as shown by Times Now News.

New Year's 2019 Resolutions - Part One