How to Get and Stay Stronger

Tips to stay healthier

To get some some excellent tips about staying/getting strong, check out the links below to several recent NY Times’ articles. There should be at least one article that addresses YOUR needs.

How to Get and Stay Stronger

 

New Year’s 2019 Resolutions – Part Two

Be motivated to set and follow cancer-related New Year’s resolutions.

As we noted yesterday, we need to set meaningful resolutions so as to be better. We should do this in a positive, motivated, and continuing manner. Today, we offer New Year’s 2019 Resolutions – Part Two.

This post deals more directly with the kinds of resolutions that those of us dealing with cancer need to address.

According to the Irish Cancer Society:

“[We are] urging people to make simple lifestyle changes, as part of their New Year’s resolutions, to significantly lower their risk of cancer. Four out of ten cancer cases are preventable by making a number of lifestyle changes recommended in the European Code Against Cancer. 40% of cancer risk has been attributed to five lifestyle factors—tobacco, diet, overweight/obesity, alcohol and low physical activity.”

“The Society suggests people follow the European Code Against Cancer, which includes 12 simple steps to help reduce their risk of cancer.”

Consider the applicable steps when setting and adhering to your own personal cancer-related resolutions for 2019.

To view a larger (and more readable) version of the infographic, click the image.

New Year's 2019 Resolutions - Part Two
 

New Year’s 2019 Resolutions – Part One

Be motivated to set and follow New Year’s resolutions.

As we begin the new year, we need to set meaningful resolutions so as to be better. We should do this a positive, motivated, and continuing manner. Today, New Year’s 2019 Resolutions – Part One. Tomorrow, New Year’s 2019 Resolutions – Part Two.

Not only start 2019 by addressing your personal resolutions, but end the year by keeping to these resolutions.

Consider these 15 resolutions as described by Health Fitness Revolution.

New Year's 2019 Resolutions - Part One

 

And these 9 resolutions from UPMC Myhealth Matters.

New Year's 2019 Resolutions - Part One

 

Now, articulate YOUR OWN plan for meeting your personal resolutions as shown by Times Now News.

New Year's 2019 Resolutions - Part One
 

Reducing Muscle Loss and Building Strength – Part 2

Recently, Jane Brody wrote two important articles for the New York Times. Here are some further highlights. Today, Part 2. Yesterday, Part 1

Building Strength — Through Tai Chi

In this second article, Brody looks at the value of tai chi in building strength:

“Watching a group of people doing tai chi, an exercise often called ‘meditation in motion,’ it may be hard to imagine that its slow, gentle, choreographed movements could actually make people stronger. Not only stronger mentally, but stronger physically and healthier as well.”

“I certainly was surprised by its effects on strength, but good research — and there’s been a fair amount of it by now — doesn’t lie. If you’re not ready or not able to tackle strength-training with weights, resistance bands, or machines, tai chi may just be the activity that can help to increase your stamina and diminish your risk of injury that accompanies weak muscles and bones.”

Click the image to learn more — and to gain encouragement as to why you should try tai chi. [It’s now on my to-do list, too.]

Reducing Muscle Loss and Building Strength - Part 2
Image by Gracia Lam

 

Reducing Muscle Loss and Building Strength – Part 1

Recently, Jane Brody wrote two important articles for the New York Times. Here are some highlights. Today, Part 1.

Reducing Muscle Loss

According to Brody:

“My young friends at the Y say I’m in great shape. And I suppose I am compared to most 77-year-old women in America today. But I’ve noticed in recent years that I’m not as strong as I used to be. Loads I once carried rather easily are now difficult, and some are impossible.”

“Thanks to an admonition from a savvy physical therapist, Marilyn Moffat, a professor at New York University, I now know why. I, like many people past 50, have a condition called sarcopenia — a decline in skeletal muscle with age. It begins as early as age 40 and, without intervention, gets increasingly worse, with as much as half of muscle mass lost by age 70. (If you’re wondering, it’s replaced by fat and fibrous tissue, making muscles resemble a well-marbled steak.)”

Click the image for tips on reducing muscle loss.

Reducing Muscle Loss and Building Strength - Part 1
Image by Gracia Lam

 

Wearables and Health Care

Recently, fitness trackers and other wearables have gained more popularity as health monitors. And this is expected to continue.

As Business Insider Intelligence reports:

“The health-care industry is undergoing a transformation due to pressure from ballooning healthcare costs, a rising burden of chronic disease, and shifting consumer expectations. Thus, wearables — including smartwatches, fitness trackers, and other connected devices — play a key role in this transformation.”

“U.S. consumer use of wearables for health purposes jumped from 9% in 2014 to 33% in 2018, according to Accenture. And penetration should continue to climb. With more than 80% of consumers willing to wear tech that measures health data. The growing adoption of wearables, and the breadth of health functions they offer, will capture a fuller picture of consumer health and behavior. Thus enabling health-care organizations to differentiate from the competition, drive value, and engage consumers.”

“In this new report, Business Insider Intelligence details the current and future market landscape of wearables in the U.S. health-care sector. We explore key drivers behind wearable usage by insurers, health-care providers, and employers. And the opportunities wearables afford to each of these stakeholders.”

“Consumers are becoming increasingly comfortable sharing the health data captured in these devices with their doctors, employers, and insurers. Such data offer opportunities to improve outcomes, reduce health-care costs, and engage customers. Providers can use wearables to improve chronic disease management, lessen the burden of a burgeoning staff shortage, and navigate a changing reimbursement model. Employers can combine wearables with cash incentives to lower insurance costs and improve employee productivity.”

 

Staying Fit and Living Longer

Ways to stay more fit.

A section of the AARP Web site deals with healthy living and staying fit.

These are examples of the types of information available at the site:

Now, click on the image to access a quiz on “What’s sabotaging your weight loss efforts?”

Staying Fit and Living Longer