Apple and Stanford Partner on Smart Watch Study

For the past year, Apple and Stanford have partnered on a health research study using the Apple Watch.

This important study is huge.

As Nicky Lineaweaver reports for Business Insider:

“Apple and Stanford Medicine enrolled more than 400,000 participants in the Apple Heart Study since its launch in November of 2017 — making it the largest study on atrial fibrillation (AFib) ever conducted. The study will help Apple explore how its Watch can be used to identify AFib, a common type of irregular heartbeat that heightens the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease.”

“AFib costs the U.S. around $6 billion annually, and is responsible for about 130,000 deaths and 750,000 hospitalizations in the US every year, the CDC reports. And AFib detection has been one of Apple’s strategic focuses in healthcare thus far — the tech giant released the Watch Series 4 with an FDA-cleared AFib detection feature in September, for example.”

The Stanford Medicine site notes:

“The Apple Heart Study app uses data from Apple Watch to identify irregular heart rhythms, including those from potentially serious heart conditions such as atrial fibrillation. Apple is conducting this research study in collaboration with Stanford Medicine to improve the technology used to detect and analyze irregular heart rhythms, like atrial fibrillation – a leading cause of stroke.”

Click the image to learn more about the study.

Apple and Stanford Partner on Smart Watch Study
 

Having a Work-Life Balance

I’ve only grasped the value of a work-life balance in recent years. You? How to do better!

Millennials do a good job at a having a work-life balance. Us older folks don’t tend to do as well. For me, work has been dominant in my life.

So, what can we do to improve our work-life balance? Let’s learn some tips from Marissa Levin, reporting for Inc.:

“Today’s work environment has permanently blurred the lines between our personal and professional lives, which requires us to be even more intentional and protective with our downtime.  Burnout and mental health issues have reached crisis levels, with nearly 1 in 12 adults having depression. The number of hours we spend online checking E-mail or engaging in social media platforms continues to grow. Adults today spend an average of 11 hours online.”

“What can we do to ensure we care for our physical and emotional health while still attending to personal and professional obligations? These 8 steps can help even the most stretched person regain control over his/her schedules and restore a sense of calm to their daily life.”

“(1) Prioritize your health. (2) Put buffers in your schedule. (3) Stay true to your agenda – not someone else’s.  (4) Schedule touchpoints with your friends. (5) Plan for long-term fun.  (6) Get your sleep. (7)  Be OK with not getting it all done. (8) Remember the power of your thoughts.”

Click the image to learn about each of these tips.

Having a Work-Life Balance
CREDIT: Getty Images

 

Pancreatic Cancer Infographic

November marks Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month.

As a pancreatic cancer survivor, November is a special month for me.

Pancreatic Cancer Action puts it this way:

“November marks Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month, a time when people across the world come together to fight back against, and raise the profile of, pancreatic cancer! It is a time of the year when we have the most voices speaking out the disease, raising funds for early diagnosis research and raising awareness in their local communities.”

Learn more about PC by reviewing this infographic from the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network.

Pancreatic Cancer Infographic
 

Reducing the Intensity of Stomach Aches

Video tips for relieving stomach aches

Many cancer patients and cancer survivors — including yours truly — have to deal with intense stomach aches. In my case, before every meal, I take Creon and Zofran to reduce my stomach issues.

Take a look at this video from Nutrition Facts for some tips.
 


 

Do Not Make These Thanksgiving Mistakes

Getting ready for the biggest family gathering of the year next Thursday? To have a very Happy Thanksgiving, there are some things we should keep in mind.

Keep up your good spirits. And be healthful while celebrating.

As Hristina Byrnes reports for 24/7 Wall St.:

“A typical Thanksgiving dinner can amount to 3,000 calories. Appetizers and drinks before, during, and after the meal can add another 1,500. That brings the total to a whopping 4,500 calories in just a few hours. This is about twice the amount a person should consume in a day.”

“Yes, Thanksgiving is about family and food. But some people drink a lot, too. The combination of too many liquid and food calories can lead to drowsiness, upset stomachs, and headaches the next morning from both the alcohol and the high sugar foods, according to Alyson Pidich, medical director of the Ash Center, a longevity and anti-aging clinic in New York City.”

“To determine the biggest and most common health mistakes people make on Thanksgiving, 24/7 Wall St. asked several doctors, nutritionists, and dietitians to share their observations and tips.”

These are a few of the tips:

  • Sitting on the couch after dinner— Your posture affects how your body digests all the food you consume. Research shows that the best position to avoid discomfort is standing. Lying down significantly slows gastric emptying compared to other positions such as sitting, standing, or a combination of sitting and standing. A separate study found that food takes about 20 minutes longer to leave the stomach if you’re sitting.”
  • Being in a hurry to prepare the meal — Being in a hurry to prepare the meal and visit with family is a common mistake. It’s a mistake because it leaves no time for exercising. Working out should be part of your holiday ‘recovery.’ You have to keep the body in motion to keep the metabolism going.”
  • Skipping the vegetables — Consuming vegetables is crucial because they are low in calories and have a lot vitamins and minerals. The fiber and water in them fill you up more efficiently than processed carbs in bread and mashed potatoes. A spoonful of mashed potatoes may be between 50 and 100 calories, while a spoonful of Brussel sprouts is just five. If you want to eat but not gain weight, you need to consume low-energy-dense foods — a big volume of food with a low amount of calories. This way you feel fuller on just a few calories.”

Click the image for further tips.

Do Not Make These Thanksgiving Mistakes
Source: itakdalee / Getty Images