Another Great Resource – Healthy People

Terrific government Web site that covers a wide range of health topics.

HealthyPeople.gov is another great resource to add to our library: “

“Healthy People provides science-based, 10-year national objectives for improving the health of all Americans. For 3 decades, Healthy People has established benchmarks and monitored progress over time in order to: Encourage collaborations across communities and sectors. Empower individuals toward making informed health decisions. Measure the impact of prevention activities.’

First, click the image to visit the home page.

Another Great Resource - Healthy PeopleThen, visit the part of the site dedicated to having healthier people in 2030.

Another Great Resource - Healthy People
 

Patient Rating of Hospitals Declined in 2019

How do YOU rate the hospitals caring for YOU?

As we know, the quality of in-hospital care greatly contributes to our health. Thus, it’s important for us to have confidence in the quality of the hospitals that care for us.

Unfortunately, in 2019 Americans’ views toward hospitals showed a decline.

According to Paige Minemyer, writing for FierceHealthCare:

“Consumer satisfaction with hospitals took a tumble this year (2019) while approval of health insurers improved. The American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) released its annual report examining the financial and insurance sectors and found that hospitals earned a score of 72 on their indicator,  based on a survey of more than 30,000 consumers and reflecting their perceptions of the quality of products they use.”

“That’s a notable drop from hospitals’ 2018 score on the index, which was 76. The decline is driven by a substantial drop in consumers’ rankings for emergency department care, from 73 in 2018 to a 67 for 2019. “

“By contrast, patient satisfaction with outpatient care settings continues to climb — ambulatory care earned a 77 score for the second year in a row. Outpatient care provided by hospitals earned a lower score, a 75, which dropped from a 78 score in 2018.”

“The report flags the wait times in the emergency department as a key factor in declining patient satisfaction with emergency care.”

Patient Rating of Hospitals Declined in 2019

A new report examines consumer satisfaction with hospitals and health plans. (Studio 642/Getty Images)
 

I Am Now a Five-Year Cancer Survivor

Hope is a precious commodity.

 

Amazing. Unbelievable. Lucky. Blessed. I am now a five-year cancer survivor.  Although some define the 5-year period as beginning at the date of diagnosis, I prefer to use the date of my Whipple surgery for pancreatic cancer. February 12, 2015. So, exactly five years ago today.

I am kind of melancholy about reaching this point. But I don’t feel the euphoria about beating the less than 10 percent survival rate for PC that I expected. I just learned this is not uncommon. According to Dr. SP, a leading psychologist, my melancholy reflects a lot of subconscious feelings about the traumatic events during my journey. Even though I try as hard as possible to be upbeat on a daily basis. Also, it relates to my profound sorrow about others with cancer who have not been so lucky. And my own continuing challenges.

Live life every day. Live as long as you can, as well as you can.

Observations about Surviving Cancer

From Cancer.Net:

“A person who has had cancer is commonly called a cancer survivor. ‘Co-survivor’ is sometimes used to describe a person who has cared for a loved one with cancer.”

“Not everyone who has had cancer likes the word ‘survivor.’ The reasons for this may vary. For instance, they may simply identify more with being ‘a person who has had cancer.’ Or if they are dealing with cancer every day they may describe themselves as ‘living with cancer.’ Therefore, they may not think of themselves as a survivor. Living with a history of cancer is different for each person. But most people have the common belief that life is different after cancer.”

“Other common reactions that people have after cancer include:

              • Appreciating life more.
              • Being more accepting of themselves.
              • Feeling more anxious about their health.
              • Not knowing how to cope after treatment ends.”

           

        • Now, check out this video.