Reducing Muscle Loss and Building Strength – Part 1

Recently, Jane Brody wrote two important articles for the New York Times. Here are some highlights. Today, Part 1.

Reducing Muscle Loss

According to Brody:

“My young friends at the Y say I’m in great shape. And I suppose I am compared to most 77-year-old women in America today. But I’ve noticed in recent years that I’m not as strong as I used to be. Loads I once carried rather easily are now difficult, and some are impossible.”

“Thanks to an admonition from a savvy physical therapist, Marilyn Moffat, a professor at New York University, I now know why. I, like many people past 50, have a condition called sarcopenia — a decline in skeletal muscle with age. It begins as early as age 40 and, without intervention, gets increasingly worse, with as much as half of muscle mass lost by age 70. (If you’re wondering, it’s replaced by fat and fibrous tissue, making muscles resemble a well-marbled steak.)”

Click the image for tips on reducing muscle loss.

Reducing Muscle Loss and Building Strength - Part 1
Image by Gracia Lam

 

Wearables and Health Care

Recently, fitness trackers and other wearables have gained more popularity as health monitors. And this is expected to continue.

As Business Insider Intelligence reports:

“The health-care industry is undergoing a transformation due to pressure from ballooning healthcare costs, a rising burden of chronic disease, and shifting consumer expectations. Thus, wearables — including smartwatches, fitness trackers, and other connected devices — play a key role in this transformation.”

“U.S. consumer use of wearables for health purposes jumped from 9% in 2014 to 33% in 2018, according to Accenture. And penetration should continue to climb. With more than 80% of consumers willing to wear tech that measures health data. The growing adoption of wearables, and the breadth of health functions they offer, will capture a fuller picture of consumer health and behavior. Thus enabling health-care organizations to differentiate from the competition, drive value, and engage consumers.”

“In this new report, Business Insider Intelligence details the current and future market landscape of wearables in the U.S. health-care sector. We explore key drivers behind wearable usage by insurers, health-care providers, and employers. And the opportunities wearables afford to each of these stakeholders.”

“Consumers are becoming increasingly comfortable sharing the health data captured in these devices with their doctors, employers, and insurers. Such data offer opportunities to improve outcomes, reduce health-care costs, and engage customers. Providers can use wearables to improve chronic disease management, lessen the burden of a burgeoning staff shortage, and navigate a changing reimbursement model. Employers can combine wearables with cash incentives to lower insurance costs and improve employee productivity.”

 

Staying Fit and Living Longer

Ways to stay more fit.

A section of the AARP Web site deals with healthy living and staying fit.

These are examples of the types of information available at the site:

Now, click on the image to access a quiz on “What’s sabotaging your weight loss efforts?”

Staying Fit and Living Longer

 

An Innovation for Disabled Rail Travelers

Treating the disabled traveler better.

Although this blog focuses on cancer-related topics, we also track good news for those dealing any health issues. So, today’s post relates to an emerging innovation that will aid disabled rail travelers.

As reported by TrendWatching:

“September 2018 saw four UK rail companies trial Passenger Assist by Transreport: an app designed to make rail journeys for disabled users easier. The app will allow disabled users to share their exact location with station staff in real-time. Currently, disabled passengers who book assistance have their scheduled arrivals and locations provided to station staff on paper at the start of the day.”

“Yes, we were shocked to learn that in 2018 — when geolocation is so commonplace that even the sheep in the Faroe Islands are on Google Maps — disabled passengers often have to wait for assistance and face the risk of being trapped on board. Clearly we have some way to go before we have our priorities with technology fully straight, but this innovation is at least a small step in the right direction.”

Click the image to read more.

An Innovation for Disabled Rail Travelers

Checking Your Health at Home

In addition to giving advice about other health exams, Better Health offers tips for checking your health at home.

Last week, we wrote about having regular health exams. Today, we look at things we can do in checking your health at home. At Australia’s  Checking Your Health at Home

“We provide health and medical information to improve the health and wellbeing of people and the communities they live in. The information on our site aims to help people understand and manage their health and medical conditions. It does not replace care provided by medical practitioners and other qualified health professionals. We are fully funded by the Victorian Government, with no commercial advertising or corporate sponsorship. “

Checking Your Health at Home

In addition to giving advice about other health exams, Better Health offers tips for checking your health at home:

“You can do a basic health check at home to review your health in relation to:”

Alcohol “People who have at least two alcohol-free days per week and stick to no more than two standard drinks per drinking day have better long-term health.”
*  Dental care – “Cleaning your teeth regularly and eating a low-sugar diet can reduce your risk of tooth decay, gum disease, and tooth loss. Visit a dentist or other oral health professional at least once a year for a dental examination and professional cleaning, or more frequently as advised by your dentist.”
Diet – “A healthy diet improves your general health and wellbeing. Have at least two servings of fruit and five serves of vegetables each day.”
Physical activity – “Regular physical activity is good for your mental health, heart and bones, and can prevent many diseases. Aim for 30 minutes to an hour of moderate physical activity a day. Moderate physical activity takes some effort, but still allows a conversation to be held (for example, brisk walking, gentle swimming, social tennis).”
Skin checks – “Check your skin regularly for unusual moles or freckles, and see your doctor if you notice anything unusual. People who work outdoors need a yearly examination by their doctor or a dermatologist.”
*  Smoking – “Smoking increases your risk of many diseases, including heart disease, stroke, lung disease, and thin bones. If you smoke, quitting as soon as possible helps reduce the harm.”
*  Weight – “Maintaining a healthy weight range helps prevent longer-term diseases, such as diabetes and arthritis.”

 

Good News Network

The Good News Network runs a nonprofit Web site dedicated to GOOD News.

The Good News Network runs a nonprofit Web site dedicated to GOOD News. As it notes: “From its beginnings, the Web site [in 1997] has been a clearinghouse for the gathering and dissemination of positive news stories from around the globe, confirming what people already know — that good news itself is not in short supply; the broadcasting of it is.”

 

Among Good News Network’s sub-sites are these:

 

Remembering to Take Your Meds

For those of US who take multiple medications each day, remembering may be a lot harder. This is especially true if medication dosage differs by time of day or by frequency.

For those of you who rarely need medications, remembering them may be rather simple. For those of US who take multiple medications each day, remembering may be a lot harder. This is especially true if medication dosage differs by time of day or by frequency.

So, thank you to Olivia DeLong for “9 Easy Ways to Remember to Take Your Meds”:

“Nearly half of Americans took one prescription drug in the past month. And about 12 percent (40 percent over the age of 65) took at least five, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Not to mention, an astounding 50 percent of Americans don’t take their medications as prescribed by their doctors.”

“People take medications for different reasons, including managing health conditions, preventing or slowing disease, relieving symptoms, and more. However, the CDC estimates that failure to keep up with medication regimens contributes to 30 to 50 percent of chronic disease treatment failures and 125,000 deaths per year in the United States.”

“Americans forgo their daily medication routines for many reasons, reports the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), including: Forgetfulness. Failure to understand the directions. Numerous medication regimens. Unwanted side effects. Cost. Perception of effectiveness.”

Click the image to read 9 tips from DeLong for better remembering to take medications.

Remembering to Take Your Meds