Checking Your Health at Home

In addition to giving advice about other health exams, Better Health offers tips for checking your health at home.

Last week, we wrote about having regular health exams. Today, we look at things we can do in checking your health at home. At Australia’s  Checking Your Health at Home

“We provide health and medical information to improve the health and wellbeing of people and the communities they live in. The information on our site aims to help people understand and manage their health and medical conditions. It does not replace care provided by medical practitioners and other qualified health professionals. We are fully funded by the Victorian Government, with no commercial advertising or corporate sponsorship. “

Checking Your Health at Home

In addition to giving advice about other health exams, Better Health offers tips for checking your health at home:

“You can do a basic health check at home to review your health in relation to:”

Alcohol “People who have at least two alcohol-free days per week and stick to no more than two standard drinks per drinking day have better long-term health.”
*  Dental care – “Cleaning your teeth regularly and eating a low-sugar diet can reduce your risk of tooth decay, gum disease, and tooth loss. Visit a dentist or other oral health professional at least once a year for a dental examination and professional cleaning, or more frequently as advised by your dentist.”
Diet – “A healthy diet improves your general health and wellbeing. Have at least two servings of fruit and five serves of vegetables each day.”
Physical activity – “Regular physical activity is good for your mental health, heart and bones, and can prevent many diseases. Aim for 30 minutes to an hour of moderate physical activity a day. Moderate physical activity takes some effort, but still allows a conversation to be held (for example, brisk walking, gentle swimming, social tennis).”
Skin checks – “Check your skin regularly for unusual moles or freckles, and see your doctor if you notice anything unusual. People who work outdoors need a yearly examination by their doctor or a dermatologist.”
*  Smoking – “Smoking increases your risk of many diseases, including heart disease, stroke, lung disease, and thin bones. If you smoke, quitting as soon as possible helps reduce the harm.”
*  Weight – “Maintaining a healthy weight range helps prevent longer-term diseases, such as diabetes and arthritis.”

 

Increase Your Energy When You’re Too Tired to Workout

Many of us often feel tired. This may make us less motivated to exercise or even move. So, what can we do to increase our energy level?

Many of us often feel tired. This may make us less motivated to exercise or even move. So, what can we do to increase our energy level?

The American Heart Association has an excellent infographic: “Power Up to Move More.

 

National Cancer Institute Resources

To continue our series on valuable resources from leading organizations, let us look at the National Cancer Institute. It offers several types of multimedia resources.

Videos (at its YouTube Channel)

Videos

Infographics

Infographics

Photography/Biomedical Illustrations

Photography and Illustrations

B-Roll Videos (PR)

PR Videos

 

How Body Weight Relates to Cancer

Question: Do you know how body weight relates to cancer? Check out the information from the American Cancer Society.

We all need to do the best we can to avoid problems that may adversely impact upon our health. Below is some good advice.

An Infographic: How Body Weight Affects Cancer

According to the American Cancer Society:

“There is growing data suggesting a strong relationship between excess body weight and increased risk of certain cancers. This infographic highlights current research that shows the significant cancer risk of excess body weight, poor nutrition and physical inactivity. It also highlights ways to reduce that risk by following American Cancer Society guidelines for achieving and maintaining a healthy weight.”


How Body Weight Affects Cancer

 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Role Model for Those with Major Illnesses

Many of us recognize the name Ruth Bader Ginsburg. We know her as an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, just the second women to be chosen for the Supreme Court. But do you also that Ruth Bader Ginsburg is a role model for those with major illnesses? 

Before reading below, check out her Wikipedia biography by clicking the image.


Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Role Model
Be sure to look at the video below of Justice Ginsburg exercising with Stephen Colbert. 🙂

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: A Role Model for Those with Major Illnesses 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is now 85 years old. She is about 5 feet tall and weighs less than 100 pounds. She has overcome significant health issues and remains active on the Supreme Court. She even has a well-chronicled exercise routine. Despite your political persuasion, Justice Ginsburg is a great role model for those of us dealing with major health issues.

As reported by Wikipedia from several sources:

“In 1999, Ginsburg was diagnosed with colon cancer; she underwent surgery that was followed by chemotherapy and radiation therapy. During the process, she did not miss a day on the bench. Ginsburg was physically weakened by the cancer treatment, and she began working with a personal trainer. In spite of her small stature, Ginsburg saw her physical fitness improve since her first bout with cancer; she was able to complete twenty full push-ups in a session before her 80th birthday.”

“On February 5, 2009, she underwent surgery for pancreatic cancer. Ginsburg had a tumor that was discovered at an early stage. She was released from a New York City hospital on February 13 and returned to the bench when the Supreme Court went back into session on February 23, 2009. On September 24, 2009, Ginsburg was hospitalized in Washington DC for lightheadedness following an outpatient treatment for iron deficiency and was released the following day.”

“On November 26, 2014, she had a stent placed in her right coronary artery after experiencing discomfort while exercising in the Supreme Court gym with her personal trainer.”

Justice Ginsburg and Exercise

As described by Katherine Ellen Foley for Quartz Media in March 2017:

“Ginsberg is in better shape than most 83-year-olds (and possibly most people), according to Politico. Twice a week, RBG meets with Bryant Johnson, a 52-year-old ex-military personal trainer, who guides her through an hour-long workout consisting of some cardio, followed by three sets of 10 to 13 reps of weight training for her whole body—including pushups, which she does without the use of her knees, according to Johnson. She also does single-leg squats, and a standing maneuver where she throws a medicine ball to Johnson before sitting down and catching it.”

More recently, Elana Lyn Gross wrote for Business Insider:

“Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is not defined by her 85 years of age – she works out with her personal trainer, Bryant Johnson, twice a week for an hour. Ginsburg’s workout is a series of full body strength exercises that target arms, chest, legs, back, shoulders, glutes, and abs. Johnson and Ginsburg have been doing the one-hour workout that he details in his book, ‘The RBG Workout: How She Stays Strong and You Can Toofor 18 years, aside from the three years he was deployed in Kuwait.”

“The workout starts with a five-minute warm-up and light stretching followed by a strength training session that includes push-ups, planks, chest presses, squats, and hip abductor exercises, then another round of stretches to cool down.”

 
Here’s a video clip of Justice Ginsburg with Stephen Colbert.