Checking Your Health at Home

In addition to giving advice about other health exams, Better Health offers tips for checking your health at home.

Last week, we wrote about having regular health exams. Today, we look at things we can do in checking your health at home. At Australia’s  Checking Your Health at Home

“We provide health and medical information to improve the health and wellbeing of people and the communities they live in. The information on our site aims to help people understand and manage their health and medical conditions. It does not replace care provided by medical practitioners and other qualified health professionals. We are fully funded by the Victorian Government, with no commercial advertising or corporate sponsorship. “

Checking Your Health at Home

In addition to giving advice about other health exams, Better Health offers tips for checking your health at home:

“You can do a basic health check at home to review your health in relation to:”

Alcohol “People who have at least two alcohol-free days per week and stick to no more than two standard drinks per drinking day have better long-term health.”
*  Dental care – “Cleaning your teeth regularly and eating a low-sugar diet can reduce your risk of tooth decay, gum disease, and tooth loss. Visit a dentist or other oral health professional at least once a year for a dental examination and professional cleaning, or more frequently as advised by your dentist.”
Diet – “A healthy diet improves your general health and wellbeing. Have at least two servings of fruit and five serves of vegetables each day.”
Physical activity – “Regular physical activity is good for your mental health, heart and bones, and can prevent many diseases. Aim for 30 minutes to an hour of moderate physical activity a day. Moderate physical activity takes some effort, but still allows a conversation to be held (for example, brisk walking, gentle swimming, social tennis).”
Skin checks – “Check your skin regularly for unusual moles or freckles, and see your doctor if you notice anything unusual. People who work outdoors need a yearly examination by their doctor or a dermatologist.”
*  Smoking – “Smoking increases your risk of many diseases, including heart disease, stroke, lung disease, and thin bones. If you smoke, quitting as soon as possible helps reduce the harm.”
*  Weight – “Maintaining a healthy weight range helps prevent longer-term diseases, such as diabetes and arthritis.”

 

Regularly Have Health Exams

What exactly should we be be tested for? To answer that question, we again turn to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Many of know that we should have regular health exams. But what exactly should we be be tested for? To answer that question, we again turn to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

According to the CDC: “It’s time to take charge of your health! Schedule an appointment with your health care provider to discuss what screenings and exams you need and when you need them.”

What Health Services are Recommended?

These links provide information about key exams, screenings, and vaccinations:

 

And these links provide tools to help prepare for your next appointment.

 

Remembering to Take Your Meds

For those of US who take multiple medications each day, remembering may be a lot harder. This is especially true if medication dosage differs by time of day or by frequency.

For those of you who rarely need medications, remembering them may be rather simple. For those of US who take multiple medications each day, remembering may be a lot harder. This is especially true if medication dosage differs by time of day or by frequency.

So, thank you to Olivia DeLong for “9 Easy Ways to Remember to Take Your Meds”:

“Nearly half of Americans took one prescription drug in the past month. And about 12 percent (40 percent over the age of 65) took at least five, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Not to mention, an astounding 50 percent of Americans don’t take their medications as prescribed by their doctors.”

“People take medications for different reasons, including managing health conditions, preventing or slowing disease, relieving symptoms, and more. However, the CDC estimates that failure to keep up with medication regimens contributes to 30 to 50 percent of chronic disease treatment failures and 125,000 deaths per year in the United States.”

“Americans forgo their daily medication routines for many reasons, reports the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), including: Forgetfulness. Failure to understand the directions. Numerous medication regimens. Unwanted side effects. Cost. Perception of effectiveness.”

Click the image to read 9 tips from DeLong for better remembering to take medications.

Remembering to Take Your Meds

100 Health-Related YouTube Channels

Feedspot has a great post on “Top 100 Health YouTube Channels On Health Tips, Nutrition, Fitness & Workout Videos For Healthy Lifestyle.” Click the image and CHECK IT OUT! 🙂

Feedspot has a great post on “Top 100 Health YouTube Channels On Health Tips, Nutrition, Fitness & Workout Videos For Healthy Lifestyle.”

Click the image and CHECK IT OUT! 🙂

100 Health-Related YouTube Channels

 

To receive a regular health video newsletter, click the image below.

100 Health-Related YouTube Channels

Are YOU Sleeping Well Enough

It’s been drilled into most of us from an early age. “Be sure to get enough sleep.” But do we get adequate sleep? Today, we look at the effects of sleep on our bodies and tips about sleeping.

It’s been drilled into most of us from an early age. “Be sure to get enough sleep.” But do we get adequate sleep? Today, we look at the effects of sleep on our bodies and tips about sleeping.

As Olivia DeLong writes for Sharecare:

“It’s a fact: Americans have trouble with sleep.  According to the National Sleep Foundation’s 2018 Sleep Health Index, which is done quarterly, 41 percent of Americans said that poor or insufficient sleep had affected their daily activities at least once in the preceding seven days.”

“And when it comes to the type of trouble many of us are experiencing, sleep expert and clinical psychologist Michael Breus, PhD, thinks that most people deal with either acute or long-term sleep deprivation as opposed to complete sleep deprivation. In other words, most people are getting less than the recommended 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night over the course of one or more days rather than not getting any sleep at all.”

“The lack of sleep affects everyone differently.  And researchers don’t fully understand the short- and long-term effects of too little sleep. But the benefits of regular sleep are very much understood. Dr. Breus says there are three different areas of concern when we talk about sleep deprivation after acute or long-term sleep deprivation: emotional, physical, and cognitive. Here’s what you can expect after one or more nights of poor sleep—plus what you can do to improve your sleep.”

Click the image to view a slide show.

Are YOU Sleeping Well Enough

Cancer Health

We highly recommend this FREE site.

Introduced in 2017, the Cancer Health Web site has information on a great many types of cancer. We highly recommend this FREE site.

Cancer Health empowers people living with cancer to actively manage and advocate for their care and improve their overall health. Launched in 2017, the Web site provides accessible information about treatment and quality of life for people with cancer and their loved ones, as well as information about cancer prevention and health policy for a general readership. The information provided on this site is designed to complement, not replace, the relationship between an individual and his/her own medical providers.”

Click the image to see the latest information at the site.

Cancer Health