Clinical Cancer Advances 2018

Each year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) publishes a report on cancer research advances. The FREE 2018 edition of the report is now available. See below.

Each year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) publishes a report on cancer research advances. The FREE 2018 edition of the report is now available. See below.

As ASCO notes:

“Cancer is one of the world’s most pressing health care challenges, with more than 14 million people receiving a cancer diagnosis each year. Thanks to investment and progress in cancer research, people today are living longer with this disease than ever before. Clinical Cancer Advances 2018 highlights the most impactful research advances and policy developments of the past year and previews where cancer science is headed. The report was developed under the direction a 20-person editorial board of experts in different oncology sub-specialties, as well as cancer prevention, quality of care, health disparities, and tumor biology.”

Clinical Cancer Advances 2018 was supported, in part, by funds from Conquer Cancer’s Mission Endowment. This report is also published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.”

Click the image to access the full 60-page report.

Clinical Cancer Advances 2018

Are YOU Sleeping Well Enough

It’s been drilled into most of us from an early age. “Be sure to get enough sleep.” But do we get adequate sleep? Today, we look at the effects of sleep on our bodies and tips about sleeping.

It’s been drilled into most of us from an early age. “Be sure to get enough sleep.” But do we get adequate sleep? Today, we look at the effects of sleep on our bodies and tips about sleeping.

As Olivia DeLong writes for Sharecare:

“It’s a fact: Americans have trouble with sleep.  According to the National Sleep Foundation’s 2018 Sleep Health Index, which is done quarterly, 41 percent of Americans said that poor or insufficient sleep had affected their daily activities at least once in the preceding seven days.”

“And when it comes to the type of trouble many of us are experiencing, sleep expert and clinical psychologist Michael Breus, PhD, thinks that most people deal with either acute or long-term sleep deprivation as opposed to complete sleep deprivation. In other words, most people are getting less than the recommended 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night over the course of one or more days rather than not getting any sleep at all.”

“The lack of sleep affects everyone differently.  And researchers don’t fully understand the short- and long-term effects of too little sleep. But the benefits of regular sleep are very much understood. Dr. Breus says there are three different areas of concern when we talk about sleep deprivation after acute or long-term sleep deprivation: emotional, physical, and cognitive. Here’s what you can expect after one or more nights of poor sleep—plus what you can do to improve your sleep.”

Click the image to view a slide show.

Are YOU Sleeping Well Enough

Commemorating 9-11-2018

We remember all victims from 9-11.

It is hard to believe that 17 years have passed since the awful events of 9-11-2001. As we said last year: 9-11-01 remains “one of the worst days in American history — a tragedy that many of us will remember forever. On this anniversary, it is a good time to reflect.” Today, we need to spend some time commemorating 9-11-2018.

We remember all victims from 9-11, including those who lost their lives on 9-11-2011 and in the years since the then. We also offer our best wishes with those who have health problems arising from 9-11.

 

Commemorating 9-11-2018

Tribute in Light is a commemorative public art installation first presented six months after 9-11 and then every year thereafter. It’s open from dusk to dawn, at night on September 11. It has become an iconic symbol that both honors those killed and celebrates the unbreakable spirit of New York. On the anniversary of 9-11, the Memorial Plaza is open to the public from 3 P.M. to midnight for the viewing of Tribute in Light. And it can also be viewed from a 60-mile radius around lower Manhattan.”


 

Explore the 9-11 Memorial Museum through this interactive video experience, selecting different paths through the Museum’s vast spaces and exhibitions.”

CLICK THE IMAGE to see the interactive video.

Commemorating 9-11-2018
 

Cancer Health

We highly recommend this FREE site.

Introduced in 2017, the Cancer Health Web site has information on a great many types of cancer. We highly recommend this FREE site.

Cancer Health empowers people living with cancer to actively manage and advocate for their care and improve their overall health. Launched in 2017, the Web site provides accessible information about treatment and quality of life for people with cancer and their loved ones, as well as information about cancer prevention and health policy for a general readership. The information provided on this site is designed to complement, not replace, the relationship between an individual and his/her own medical providers.”

Click the image to see the latest information at the site.

Cancer Health

Increase Your Energy When You’re Too Tired to Workout

Many of us often feel tired. This may make us less motivated to exercise or even move. So, what can we do to increase our energy level?

Many of us often feel tired. This may make us less motivated to exercise or even move. So, what can we do to increase our energy level?

The American Heart Association has an excellent infographic: “Power Up to Move More.

 

We Are NOT Alone — Part 2

This is a continuation of yesterday’s excerpt from my book Surviving Cancer and Embracing Life: My Personal Journey. It is available FREE by clicking here.

In the U.S. alone, people share their lives with 70 million dogs (in 43 million households) and 74 million cats (in 36 million households) – as reported by the American Veterinary Medicine Association. We love our pets; and they love us in return.

Before getting to my personal pet story, let’s consider how vital pets are to our psychological and physical health. Over the past several years, we have witnessed the growth in companion pets. Although some individuals may stretch the rules in getting their “companion” pets onto planes and into other venues, the basic premise is sound: Pets can be soothing and calming.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says:

Studies show that the bond between people and pets can increase fitness, lower stress, and bring happiness to their owners. Some health benefits of having a pet include: Decreased blood pressure. Decreased cholesterol. Decreased triglycerides. Decreased feelings of loneliness. Increased opportunities for exercise and outdoor activities. Increased opportunities for socialization.

A great example of the value of pets involves military veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress syndrome after returning home. There are several non-profits that help to enrich the lives of those veterans, including Companions for Heroes, Pets for Veterans, and America’s Vets Dogs. The dogs are well-trained and help vets to reduce stress.

Linda and I are cat lovers and have shared our home with many cats over the years. Yes, cats can be affectionate and intuitive. One cat, Tucker, will sit in my lap all day in my home office and lie on me for hours when I’m on the couch in the den.

When I returned home after my surgery, our cats KNEW I was sick. They lay in bed with me 24/7 and often cuddled next to me. They constantly nuzzled my hand. Their attention required no effort on my part and was crucial early in my recovery.